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This is the terminal at KSTS. Someone mentioned to me that your can't overfly this area. (I fly helicopters direct to the ramp adjacent.) What regulations discuss this? I don't see it in the AIM.

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ I don't see anything on the FAA Airport Diagram either, 155.178.201.160/d-tpp/1810/00696AD.PDF Wouldn't a helicopter normally airtaxi over the regular taxi lines? Have a look in the FARs for "keepout area" or "restricted area" perhaps. $\endgroup$
    – CrossRoads
    Commented Oct 1, 2018 at 0:38
  • $\begingroup$ I couldn't find that pattern in AC 150/5340-1L - Standards for Airport Markings. Interesting question. $\endgroup$
    – user14897
    Commented Oct 1, 2018 at 0:40
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    $\begingroup$ youtu.be/wvdNCDVmRPo $\endgroup$
    – TomMcW
    Commented Oct 1, 2018 at 5:12
  • $\begingroup$ There aren't any regulations about that; they just have a magic forcefield that knocks you out of the sky if you try to overfly that area. $\endgroup$
    – Vikki
    Commented Sep 2, 2021 at 22:08

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I believe it's a non-standard marking to indicate a Security Identification Display Area (SIDA), where you need a specific badge to have access. The TSA sets the requirements for access. If you zoom in you can see the words "AIRLINE EMPLOYEES ONLY" beside the markings.

I don't think there's any standard marking for SIDAs. There was a proposal in the draft version of AC 150/5340-1K - Standards for Airport Markings (see section 5.15 for all the details):

The SIDA marking is a rectangular stripe with white legends that are centered within a red background. Paint colors are per AC 150/5370-2, Item P-620, Runway and Taxiway Painting.

But, it didn't make it into the final version:

Drops a proposed new surface marking for areas designated by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and the airport operator as a security identification display area (SIDA) (reassigned paragraph 5.15 to cover markings for aircraft deicing facilities and removed proposed figure C-14). TSA accepted the task to address future markings for the airside.

And as ymb1 pointed out in a comment, it's not in the current version of that AC either. Presumably the TSA is still working on it.

If you look at a SIDA at another airport, you can see differences. The SIDA at KLEX (Lexington, KY) is marked by a single red line, for example:

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  • $\begingroup$ Yup, you nailed it. I couldn't remember the acronym he had used. Still trying to determine if there is really an overflight restriction (if it were unoccupied) or if it's just a good idea to avoid it. As helicopter pilots we get clearance to land on taxiways and non-movement areas "at pilots own risk". We can generally maneuver as needed to reach the touchdown (avoiding overflight or people and taxing and parked aircraft) So I was surprised to hear there might be part of the ramp that you can't overfly. $\endgroup$
    – user28642
    Commented Oct 1, 2018 at 1:46
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    $\begingroup$ @JohnHutchinson SIDAs are airport-specific, so you could ask the airport management. But I'm pretty sure that no such rule exists: if you're airborne, how can other people see if you're wearing a badge, and challenge you if you aren't? Having said all that, "don't invite unnecessary attention from the TSA" is a universally accepted rule ;-) Maybe that was the practical point of what you were told. $\endgroup$
    – Pondlife
    Commented Oct 1, 2018 at 2:04
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    $\begingroup$ ok, I tracked this back to the source of the comment (two hops) and indeed it was expressed as "you should avoid the SIDA". This got inflated to "overflight prohibited" along the way.... $\endgroup$
    – user28642
    Commented Oct 1, 2018 at 16:39

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