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On a question "How plane able to fly on a side" people answer that it's because fuselage shape crate lifting force and plane should have enough thrust. But that seems vague to me. How fuselage creates lift ? Wing shaped that way that more air goes under it, so there more pressure below wing than above it. But fuselage is the same from both sides, so how it able to create lift after rotated on side ? enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ "Wing shaped that way that more air goes under it, so there more pressure below wing than above it." I do not think that is a good explanation of how a wing works. $\endgroup$ – David K Sep 30 '18 at 15:17
  • $\begingroup$ @David K unexpected. And how do they work actually ? $\endgroup$ – R S Sep 30 '18 at 15:20
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    $\begingroup$ You might try grc.nasa.gov/www/k-12/airplane/right2.html. They mention that even a flat plate can produce lift, although the pictures all show wing-shaped airfoils. There is plenty of discussion about the theory of lift in other questions on this site as well. $\endgroup$ – David K Sep 30 '18 at 15:43
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    $\begingroup$ Has nothing to do with aircraft attitude. It has to do with the aircraft sideslip angle or yaw. If you stuff the rudder to one side, the aircraft is in a sideslip. The relative wind is now hitting the aircraft asymmetrically, from a direction to one side of the nose, and this creates a small amount of lift. $\endgroup$ – Charles Bretana Oct 3 '18 at 1:12
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Wings and fuselages both produce lift in the same way: they change the direction of the oncoming air. If you want an object to generate lift, the object doesn't need to be any particular shape. You only need two things:

  • The object's cross section should be long and skinny.
  • The object should be at an angle relative to the oncoming air.

Fuselages are long and thin, and during knife-edge (sideways) flight, they're at an angle relative to the oncoming air. Therefore, they generate lift.

See also: How do symmetrical airfoils generate lift?

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The photo that you posted already gives quite a few hints on how this can be possible:

  1. The aircraft is flying at a sideslip angle (the nose pointed slightly up), so a part of the thrust vector is counteracting the weight.
  2. It seems like the aircraft is not exactly perpendicular to the surface, so a part of the lift vector is still counteracting the weight.
  3. The vertical stabilizers produce some "lift" in this situation due to the sideslip angle mentioned in 1. Note that these typically have symmetrical airfoils, so without the sideslip angle, these would not create any force.
  4. The aircraft might be descending in a controlled way. In that case, not all of the weight must be carried.

As an example, look at the high sideslip angle here:

. There you can also see the rudder being deflected for trimming.

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Aircraft have multiple surfaces that move, in a maneuver like the one you posted a picture of, the aircraft will be relying on multiple surfaces to maintain altitude, this is a combination of the ailerons, the rudders, and elevators.

Objects in motion will stay in motion until they hit something. Also, the forces of flight don't necessarily mean straight up and down, those axis's can move relative to the aircraft.

Source- Pilot for years.

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With proper attitude control and enough thrust, a washing machine or a refrigerator can fly. Angle of attack and lift are not something exclusive of wings...

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