1
$\begingroup$

A question regarding the dual 100nm day/night 2 hours.

Does a 130nm flight with 1 stop halfway (over 2 hrs) count? 1 leg of 80nm, 2 leg 50nm. Total time 2.5hrs.

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Hi EchoS, welcome to Aviation! For questions like this please provide a region that you're interested in. I assume you're asking about the USA, but it's much easier to provide an answer if you say so specifically. $\endgroup$ – Steve V. Sep 25 '18 at 4:22
  • $\begingroup$ If you're asking whether cross-country flights in the US must be one continuous leg or not, this question might be useful. $\endgroup$ – Pondlife Nov 24 '18 at 23:38
  • $\begingroup$ What kind of Flintstones cardboard box are you flying that takes 2.5 hrs to cover 130 nm? $\endgroup$ – pericynthion Dec 25 '18 at 4:53
1
$\begingroup$

Your question didn't give enough information for a 100% correct answer, so I'm going to make a few assumptions:

  • You are asking about FAA certification in the USA
  • You are asking about part 61 training, not part 141, 142, or anything else
  • You're asking about a single-engine commercial rating (this one is less important than the other two)

With those assumptions in mind, the controlling regulation is 61.169(A)(3)(iii-iv), which says (emphasis added):

(iii) One 2-hour cross country flight in a single engine airplane in daytime conditions that consists of a total straight-line distance of more than 100 nautical miles from the original point of departure;

(iv) One 2-hour cross country flight in a single engine airplane in nighttime conditions that consists of a total straight-line distance of more than 100 nautical miles from the original point of departure;

So you need to ask yourself:

  • Did you fly at least 2 hours?
  • Did you land at an airport at least 100 miles away from the original point of departure?
  • Did you do the entire flight during the day/night?

If so then you're good. If not then no.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks Steve, I'll be more specific this time. You're right in all 3 assumptions. FAA Certification, Part 61, Commercial Single Engine Land. The example: I depart at night with an instructor, for a 90nm flight (straight line), then fly another 50nm leg. I end up landing in an airport which is 140nm from the origin. None of the legs were 100nm, but I landed in an airport 140nm away from the origin. Total flight duration 2.5hrs. Am I good or not? $\endgroup$ – EchoS Sep 25 '18 at 6:30
  • $\begingroup$ No, because you didn't go at least 100nm before landing. $\endgroup$ – CrossRoads Sep 25 '18 at 15:38
  • $\begingroup$ @EchoS Yes. As Steve V said, you literally met the requirement of the FARs so you are fine. By the way, make sure the instructor writes in your logbook that the flight is to satisfy 61.169(A)(3)(iv). For my commercial night I did just about the same thing, except that it was three legs and 131 nm. We made dogleg stops to get night current and also to make the total flight more than 2 hours. $\endgroup$ – JScarry Oct 25 '18 at 22:13
  • $\begingroup$ "from the original point of departure" implies there can be intermediate points of departure, i.e. multiple legs. If they meant one leg of 100nm, they would have worded it differently. $\endgroup$ – StephenS Dec 24 '18 at 22:11
0
$\begingroup$

Be careful here, you're going to have to full the requirements to the exact letter of the law or the FAA or other regulatory bodies will not approve your application to take the practical exam.

61.129(a)(3)(iii) and (iv) or 61.129(b)(3)(iii) and (iv), dependent on the aircraft category or class you are applying for, state:

One 2 hour cross country flight in a single/multi engine airplane in daytime conditions that consists of a total straight line distance of more than 100 nautical miles from the original point of departure.

and

One 2 hour cross country flight in a single/multi engine in nighttime conditions that consists of a total straight line distance of more than 100 nautical miles from the original point of departure.

Get out a chart plotter and a VFR sectional and draw a straight line from your point of departure to the destination airport. If this straight line exceeds 100 nautical miles and is made during the conditions you are required to satisfy for the rating, then the conditions are met. At least one leg of the proposed cross country flight must have a straight line departure to destination distance of at least 100 nm, the rest of the cc is up to your discretion.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Carlo You almost got it right. "Total straight line distance" is not the same thing as "one leg". $\endgroup$ – JScarry Dec 24 '18 at 17:33

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.