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One of the requirements for an FAA commercial certificate is:

§61.129: (3) 20 hours of training on the areas of operation listed in §61.127(b)(1) of this part that includes at least—

...

(iii) One 2-hour cross country flight in a single engine airplane in daytime conditions that consists of a total straight-line distance of more than 100 nautical miles from the original point of departure;

Since it just says 100 nautical miles from the original point of departure, would a flight that was 268 NM and 2h 29m, but included a stop halfway count for this requirement?

Also, does the "20 hours of training" mean that the 2-hour/100 NM flight needs to be with an instructor?

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  • $\begingroup$ is it just me or is "nm" nanometers while "NM" is nautical miles? $\endgroup$ – FreeMan Sep 20 '18 at 12:17
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    $\begingroup$ @FreeMan updated, but I think it was pretty clear in context. $\endgroup$ – Arel Sep 20 '18 at 13:44
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    $\begingroup$ Sorry, that was really just me thinking out loud as a non-pilot and being momentarily confused by your title. $\endgroup$ – FreeMan Sep 20 '18 at 13:48
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    $\begingroup$ @JScarry - Another way to state your point: who's to say the halfway stop isn't the destination, and the second leg is just another flight? $\endgroup$ – ymb1 Sep 20 '18 at 15:01
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    $\begingroup$ Everything in §61.129 Part 3 falls under the training wording so an instructor is required. They should explicitly log it as training required by §61.129 in your log book. $\endgroup$ – JScarry Sep 20 '18 at 15:09
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Affirmative. That flight will have to be part of the dual training time required for the airman certificate.

And, yes, you can do a stopover during the flight; the experience requirement does not prohibit it.

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