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I am undergraduate student still trying to figure out a lot about Aerodynamics and aircraft design. I am learning how to design rc planes.

So the thing I know the weight of my plane which is between 700 gm to 1000 gm and velocity which is 13 m/s.

I just know the basics that is the lift formula and other fundamentals. I want to know how to design a nice fuselage for my plane and also how to keep balance in my plane. I seriously need help and also there are courses where you learn all this, but they ask for heavy cash.

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closed as off-topic by kevin, Ralph J, Manu H, Sanchises, Gerry Sep 5 '18 at 12:11

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about aviation, within the scope defined in the help center." – Ralph J, Gerry
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Hi Sai. I will let the community decide on this, but I have to warn you that this question is a bit borderline for us, as it asks to locate external resources (leaving aside that "best" is opinion-based) and generally these questions are not accepted here. Please take a moment to go through these help pages: aviation.stackexchange.com/help/dont-ask aviation.stackexchange.com/help/on-topic $\endgroup$ – Federico Sep 4 '18 at 14:24
  • $\begingroup$ Are you open to learning from paper books as opposed to web sites? There are a number of very good books on aerodynamic design oriented toward model size aircraft, typically sold through hobby supply outlets. $\endgroup$ – Zeiss Ikon Sep 4 '18 at 14:40
  • $\begingroup$ Yes !...I am to books too! $\endgroup$ – sai teja Sep 4 '18 at 14:55
  • $\begingroup$ As Federico explained, this question is a bit borderline on 3 areas: asking for external resources (off topic), asking for best resource (opinion-based), asking for RC planes (most of us fly real planes here, although aerodynamics still applies). I hesitated for a few minutes but ultimately decided to vote to close. I hope the existing answers, as well as this related question here, covers what you need. $\endgroup$ – kevin Sep 5 '18 at 2:24
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It's not a website, but it's totally worth buying: Dan Raymer's Simplified Aircraft Design for Homebuilders (ISBN 10: 0972239707 ISBN 13: 9780972239707) is applicable to RC aircraft and has the best ratio of comprehensive coverage to beginner-friendliness of any resource I know.

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13 meters per second calculates out to around 30 mph. At 1 kilogram, you should have no problem whatsoever getting it in the air. Models at this weight generally land at around 8 to 15 mph and are capable of around 50+ mph at full throttle. I would start by looking at classic airplane designs like the Piper Cub.

One of the best sources of more info would be your local hobby shop.

Bob

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