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Does anyone know where I can find information on a DC-9-30's turn radius at various altitudes and airspeeds? I've tried Googling it, but all I've found is information about its turn radius while taxiing.

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No different from any other jet. Use this turn radius calculator http://www.csgnetwork.com/aircraftturninfocalc.html

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    $\begingroup$ @Sean, if you want to take these things into account, you have to specify them. Very, very precisely. And also specify what you actually mean by turn radius, because once wind is involved, you can be using wind-relative or ground-relative frame of reference and the results will obviously be different in each (and the turn will not really be a circle in the ground one). $\endgroup$ – Jan Hudec Aug 14 '18 at 5:21
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    $\begingroup$ @Sean, I believe you can account for density by simply giving all the speeds as TAS valid for the desired density altitude. $\endgroup$ – Jan Hudec Aug 14 '18 at 5:25
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    $\begingroup$ @JanHudec: The specific scenario I have in mind is DC-9-32, ground-relative turn radius, 10-knot wind, temperature 85F, altitude 10,800' AMSL, 260 KIAS. $\endgroup$ – Sean Aug 14 '18 at 5:37
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    $\begingroup$ @Sean As a constant wind from one direction distorts the turn, speaking of ground-related turn radius doesn’t make much sense in practice, I‘d say - it constantly changes throughout the turn. If you specify wind direction and speed (assuming constant wind) as well as bank angle used for the turn and aircraft heading before and after the turn, one can model the ground track, if that helps? $\endgroup$ – Cpt Reynolds Aug 14 '18 at 7:12
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    $\begingroup$ @CptReynolds: Yes, that'll do (wind from 115 degrees at 10 knots). $\endgroup$ – Sean Aug 14 '18 at 11:30

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