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I understand that you need to get an overflight permit before entering Cuban airspace, even if you aren't landing there. How do you go about getting permission to overfly them enroute to another country?

Updated now that flights to Cuba are allowed by US operators. What has changed, and what are the requirements now? Can we pay them directly yet?

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  • $\begingroup$ Isn't it small enough that going around it is not very different from avoiding a class B airspace? $\endgroup$ – mah Dec 18 '13 at 11:32
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    $\begingroup$ @mah: Considering that the island is almost 43,000 square miles (and the airspace is even more) I'm going with no, it isn't the same. And even if it were, lots of people fly through class B airspace instead of going around it in order to save time and money. :-) $\endgroup$ – Lnafziger Dec 18 '13 at 13:18
  • $\begingroup$ Is this just a problem for US pilots? I think this question or its answers needs some clarity in that regard. $\endgroup$ – called2voyage Dec 18 '13 at 14:32
  • $\begingroup$ @called2voyage: Good question. If I had to guess I would say that anybody needs permission to overfly the country so that you don't get shot down, but a reference would be good to find! $\endgroup$ – Lnafziger Dec 18 '13 at 18:50
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    $\begingroup$ There's a great article here: universalweather.com/blog/2013/03/… $\endgroup$ – Danny Beckett Dec 18 '13 at 20:14
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The IACC navigation fees are approximately $170 for a small jet, plus there is a service fee to issue. There is a full list at World Air Operations and you can in fact order the permit for Cuba online there too.

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  • $\begingroup$ I should add - the rules are changing slowly as regards landing in Cuba for US operators - they expect that by mid 2016 it will be open to all. Let's see. $\endgroup$ – Mitchell Delahunt Dec 14 '15 at 16:49
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AOPA has a short article about flying over Cuba, it includes the following quote:

It is important for all U.S. pilots and U.S. aircraft owners to know that in order to request a[n overflight] permit, or to pay fees to Cuba related to your aircraft, you must obtain an OFAC license or retain the services of a provider that has an OFAC license

Since OFAC appears to have virtually no web presence, I would assume that using a third-party provider is the most viable option. Another (older) AOPA article mentions one.

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    $\begingroup$ Thanks, this is good info, however I'm looking specifically for how to get an overflight. I.e. from who? Is there a list of providers? $\endgroup$ – Lnafziger Dec 18 '13 at 18:51
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Yep, the 3rd party route is easiest. We've used World Air Ops (Canada) for this in the past, http://www.worldairops.com/permits/cuba.html. For our aircraft (CL601) the Nav fee was around $150.

The application fee $50 or so.

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