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Most passenger aircraft (airliners and business aircraft) have an internal door or doorway connecting the cockpit area to the main cabin; are there passenger aircraft where there is a solid partition isolating the cockpit from the passenger cabin, and passing between the two requires exiting the aircraft?

Yes, I know that many early passenger aircraft had enclosed cabins with separate, open cockpits; I'm wondering about aircraft with an enclosed cockpit and a separate, enclosed cabin.

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    $\begingroup$ Looking at this photo, it looks like the Caravan's cockpit is merely the front end of the cabin; by "no cockpit door or doorway", I meant the opposite extreme, with no internal access at all between the cockpit area and passenger cabin. Will edit the question to clarify this. $\endgroup$ – Sean Jun 15 '18 at 20:56
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    $\begingroup$ I don't think anything modern will meet your criteria, however some of the very first passenger planes were pretty much just that, with pilots often still sitting in open-cockpit while passengers where "seated" in the fuselage. $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Jun 15 '18 at 21:17
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    $\begingroup$ While such a thing could be built, it seems rather impractical. You'd need a separate lavatory for the crew, separate facilities for the crew to get food and drinks, a separate entrance, etc... $\endgroup$ – Zach Lipton Jun 15 '18 at 21:20
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    $\begingroup$ @ZachLipton that's a fair point but it could also be argued that the 747 without the staircase would fit that description. $\endgroup$ – fooot Jun 16 '18 at 2:13
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    $\begingroup$ @fooot True, though sacrificing all that premium passenger space (even more on the 747-8) would be a nightmare for airlines and could tip the economics of whether the aircraft even makes sense to fly. $\endgroup$ – Zach Lipton Jun 16 '18 at 2:34
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Some DH.83 Fox Moth had an enclosed cockpit (not all, some had open cockpits). Several examples are still flying, including one in Ottawa.

It has a cabin for three passengers with an entry door, and behind and above that a cockpit with (in some aircraft) a sliding glass canopy

Flying example from Vintage Wings of Canada Wikipedia page

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The only one I can think of is the Junkers F13. It has an open cockpit and an enclosed 6 passenger cabin. There's no access between the two areas; only a small window.

Rimowa Junkers F13.
Credit:THOMAS LÜTHI / RIMOWA 2016

The CEO of Remowa is having recreations made of the aircraft which first flew in 1919. It was (according to Rimowa) the world’s first all-metal commercial aircraft.

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  • $\begingroup$ Nice find, but it has an open cockpit, and the question specifically asks about "aircraft with an enclosed cockpit and a separate, enclosed cabin". (Italics in original, but bolding added.) $\endgroup$ – Sean Apr 7 at 1:00
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Okay, I may have found one; the Bristol Wayfarer (a passenger version of the Bristol Freighter) had a passenger cabin in the main fuselage, with an enclosed cockpit perched on top. The aircraft's arrangement makes me suspect that the cockpit was isolated from the main passenger cabin, but I can't confirm yet whether or not that was actually the case. As @jwenting's comment points out, the Freighter must have had some internal access between the cockpit and cabin, as it doesn't appear to have had any external cockpit access doors (except for a roof escape hatch which was probably not routinely used for non-emergency crew ingress and egress).

There's also the Tu-116, a modified Tu-95 bomber with two passenger cabins mounted in its fuselage where the bomb bay had previously gone, with no internal access between these and the cockpit; two, originally meant to carry Nikita Khrushchev to other countries (although, as it turned out, they never actually carried the Comrade General Secretary), were built, but served only as military transports (so, partial example?).

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  • $\begingroup$ Really? Again with the drive-by downvoting? $\endgroup$ – Sean Apr 7 at 4:21
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    $\begingroup$ probably because you don't answer the question, but rather just provide some unfounded speculation. btw, looking at photos of the Bristol 170 it does not appear to have external doors to the cockpit, unless you count the hatch in the roof. $\endgroup$ – jwenting Apr 8 at 5:26
  • $\begingroup$ Link to video clip on the Tu-116-- the first aircraft in this video-- youtube.com/watch?v=xbXURIgfYvc $\endgroup$ – quiet flyer Jun 23 at 15:56
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as far as I know, there is no such aircraft. Simply because it would be very hard to realize. The cockpit is at the very front of the aircraft. Followed by the cabin.

Even large modern cockpits are comparably small and don't offer a lot of space. All modern passenger aircraft are designed in such a way that the front door or doors (if one on each side) are located right BEHIND the cockpit. These doors are also used for the flight crew, to get aboard the plane, passing then through the cockpit door.

Meaning not to have a cockpit door, would mean that the cockpit would have to had its own door, which could only be used by the flight crew to get inside and outside. This would mean a way larger cockpit and would probably not make a lot of sense, given that most aircraft are already pretty scarce when it comes to free space.

The cockpit door of all modern aircraft however, is locked from unauthorized access. We have a switch in the cockpit, where we can put the door into auto, unlocked or locked mode. If unlocked, the door is open. If locked, the door is closed and cannot be opened by anyone. In standard, auto-mode, doors are locked but can be opened by cabin crew, usually by entering a key combination. Also the side cockpit windows can be removed in case of emergency and serve an an emergency exit for the pilots, which is used only by them. To leave the aircraft this way, a rope is needed. One of these ropes is part of the emergency equipment of both, the PIC and the PNF/FO and is found in a storage located on the upper side to of the cockpit to the left and right.

Smaller aircraft and general aviation planes usually don't employ a separate cockpit. Cabin and cockpit are just one big space.

Cheers

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    $\begingroup$ If necessary, the cockpit ropes can be used to evacuate people other than just the pilots; I can't recall off the top of my head which one precisely it was, but I've read about a runway overrun by a DC-10 where all the slides were popped by fire before everyone was able to evacuate, and the last few passengers and cabin crew had to slide down the cockpit ropes. $\endgroup$ – Sean Nov 11 '18 at 4:49
  • $\begingroup$ Update: I was thinking of Continental 603. $\endgroup$ – Sean Nov 15 '18 at 0:06
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    $\begingroup$ I have not known! Thanks for sharing. $\endgroup$ – BenjB Nov 25 '18 at 22:29
  • $\begingroup$ Note that older aircraft did have separate cockpit door, e.g. Lockheed Constellation. But they still had the door from cockpit to cabin, because why not. $\endgroup$ – Jan Hudec Apr 9 at 5:56

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