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Runways having a significant curve between the two ends aren't exactly common, but they do exist, one good example being Elk City Airport's runway 14/35.

When operating to or from an airport with a curved runway, what does one have to do differently than with a straight runway?

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    $\begingroup$ Hi. Could I ask that you use your privilege of suggesting new tags carefully. before adding new tags please consider if they might have wider usage, or whether they're just a bit too niche. A good indication (although not a perfect one!) is that there would be a fair amount of existing questions that would benefit from the tag. In this case [curved-runways] was probably a bit niche for now. $\endgroup$ – Jamiec Jun 5 '18 at 12:53
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I know that KAVX has quite a hump in the middle of the runway which does not allow for departing aircraft to see all the way down the runway, and I'd imagine that the procedures are the same as they would be for Elk City Airport. The Facilities Directory/Chart Supplement for KAVX says:

PILOTS CANNOT SEE ACFT ON OPPOSITE ENDS OF RWY DUE TO GRADIENT, MUST ANNC TAKING ACT RWY ON UNICOM PRIOR TO DEP

Essentially, communicate your intentions on the common traffic frequency. Where you are taxiing, what runway you are using and when you're about to take off. Also be vigilant watching for traffic that may be using the opposing runway.

On a curved runway, Your main concern is that someone else would be approaching or using the opposite runway while you are using the other end. This is even recommended in the Chart Supplement for Elk City, which says

LAND RY 14 TKOF RY 35 WHEN WIND CONDITIONS ALLOW

As far as actually taking off on a runway that is not straight, you'd need to take into consideration obstacles around the runway environment. In the case of Elk City, I'd hold off on rotating until after the bend so that I can climb straight out and get above tree level prior to making a turn. It appears as though that is in line with the Chart Supplement instructions, as landing RWY14 would give you the longest length to land and start to slow before you had to make the turn, and taking off on RWY35 would have you turning prior to rotation speed (or at least shortly thereafter).

Elk City Runway

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  • $\begingroup$ If anyone is curious, here's a video of a Cessna landing on Runway 14 at Elk City. Watching that video makes me nervous, but then I'm not a pilot. $\endgroup$ – Michael Seifert Jun 5 '18 at 20:04
  • $\begingroup$ I'm wondering why that made you nervous, to me it actually makes the curve in the runway look pretty benign. Seems like the pilot was plenty slow and under control and it hardly seemed like much of a turn while he slowed down. Is it the unimproved (grass) strip that makes you nervous? $\endgroup$ – Canuk Jun 7 '18 at 8:30
  • $\begingroup$ I think my nervousness stems from the fact that I don't really have a feel for how much steering control a plane has if it's moving at more than "automobile speed" on the ground. The grass strip also made it seem less in control. But I've never even flown in a Cessna, let alone piloted one. $\endgroup$ – Michael Seifert Jun 7 '18 at 13:27
  • $\begingroup$ A small Cessna moving at more than automobile speed will be flying. $\endgroup$ – Michael Hall Feb 2 at 22:30

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