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I just met my night-time currency requirements at KONT.

Landing and taking off from a 12000 foot runway in a Cessna 152 got me to thinking (always dangerous, I know).

There's more than enough room to land to a full stop, take off, climb to (e.g. 50 feet AGL), then immediately land again to a full stop without needing to go around the pattern.

Could doing the above count as two takeoffs and landings?

Perusing FAR 61.57 did not give me an answer.

Now I'm not suggesting that this is a good idea, but brings up a few questions;

1) Is this a legal maneuver?

2) If so, would it meet currency requirements? (If not, chapter/verse of the regulations kindly requested).

3) Assuming it's ok with the tower, how would I request such a move?

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    $\begingroup$ If I could find a citation, I would have included it as an answer - this came up at a FAA seminar were certain maintenance actions require a check flight. The FAA views a landing as going from normal cruise to the landing configuration with full stop. So, if you can get the flaps up, throttle and speed set to cruise and still land full stop - it would count. The only reason I can think that the FAA might disqualify this is most 12,000ft runways have glide slope indicators such as VASI and you are required to use it when available. I.E a large dry lake bed would allow multiple straight in. $\endgroup$ – jwzumwalt May 29 '18 at 22:49
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    $\begingroup$ It's shortcuts like this that usually result in accidents. Why wouldn't you want to practice your climb-out and approach too? $\endgroup$ – BDLPPL May 30 '18 at 8:33
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There's more than enough room to land to a full stop, take off, climb to (e.g. 50 feet AGL), then immediately land again to a full stop without needing to go around the pattern.

50 feet is completely arbitrary. Why not 5 feet? If the wheels leave the ground and touch back down, you took off and landed didn't you?

The regs exist to make sure you're maintaining some basic proficiency. Cutting corners to fulfill the letter of the law without actually refreshing your skills does no one any good — least of all you. Besides, as jwzumwalt pointed out, it most likely wouldn't meet the FAA's definition of takeoff and landing.

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You are asking three different questions; I will answer the second.

CFR 61.57 specifies three takeoffs and landings are required in 90 days to satisfy general and night experience requirements. For instrument experience, the same section requires six IFR approaches, holding procedures, etc.

Since approaches are specifically required for instrument experience, the lack of specific requirement for night and general experience means your proposal should fit within the regs for currency. I could find no Advisory Circular to the contrary.

It does not mean that it is smart or legal at that airport.

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