4
$\begingroup$

Reading an article about Pahoa, I read that erupting Hawaiian volcanoes produce a combination of lava and haze - resulting in clouds that contain hydrochloric acid. Are these as dangerous as volcanic ash clouds? What are the possible consequences for nearby flights?

$\endgroup$
2
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ One is chemically corrosive, one is mechanically corrosive. Flights are sure to be avoiding flying thru either. $\endgroup$
    – CrossRoads
    May 21 '18 at 18:47
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Other outlets (e.g., BBC) are reporting it as vog (volcanic smog/fog), which is different from laze. I think it makes a difference. $\endgroup$
    – ymb1
    May 21 '18 at 23:39
4
$\begingroup$

Laze is produced by lava running into the ocean, which limits both volume and dispersion of harmful products. Volcanic ash can be blown high into the air in astonishing amounts by explosions at a volcano summit, making it possible for wind to spread the particles over a wide area.

The 2010 eruptions in Iceland blew ash several kilometers into the atmosphere and across much of Northern Europe, shutting down air traffic for days. Both types of emissions have abrasive particulates and corrosive chemicals, so the biggest determinants of harm are dispersion and volume. Ash is by far the more dangerous.

see Kileua sends ash 30,000 feet high and this isn't even considered a very explosive volcano.

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
2
  • $\begingroup$ I don't feel this answers the question. Why is it dangerous? $\endgroup$
    – Cloud
    May 23 '18 at 9:55
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Cloud Both types of emissions have abrasive particulates and corrosive chemicals, so the biggest determinants of harm are dispersion and volume. $\endgroup$
    – Pilothead
    May 23 '18 at 15:41

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.