4
$\begingroup$

Question: How should the flight controls be held while taxiing a tailwheel airplane into a right quartering headwind?

enter image description here

Answer: When taxiing a tailwheel airplane into a right quartering headwind, use up aileron on the right hand wing and up elevator.

My answer: put the control to the right should be enough, why bother the elevator?

$\endgroup$
4
$\begingroup$

The wind could pick up the tail in tailwheel aircraft which is why they recommend elevator up to prevent that scenario. If the wind is really bad the tail could possibly get higher than the wings and flip the airplane over. This will not be an issue for tricycle gear aircraft so elevator doesn't matter in this case. This will be tested on the FAA knowledge exam so you will want to remember this.

$\endgroup$
1
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ It's more to keep the maximum down force on the tail wheel for controlability, and maximum resistance to nosing over when braking. Same reason you hold the stick in your gut after the tailwheel touches on landing. My current airplane is tri-gear and I taxi with the stick back to lift the nosewheel at bit higher for prop clearance on gravel. That can be a problem; I recall an event where a 150 pulled out behind a Dash 7 and went the opposite way with the elevator full up, just as the Dash 7 made a big burst of power on one side to help with a tight turn, and flipped the 150 over. $\endgroup$
    – John K
    May 16 '18 at 18:27
1
$\begingroup$

When taxiing into any headwind component (including a quartering wind) you should use up elevator on most general aviation aircraft.

On a tailwheel aircraft, keeping load firmly on the rear wheel helps provide directional stability and reduces any tendency to pitch forward on braking or when negotiating uneven ground, which in severe cases could risk a prop strike.

On a tricycle aircraft it is less of an issue. However, there is still some benefit in that it reduces the load on the front wheel/strut. The pair of rear wheels/struts are usually stronger than the front (as the rear pair are designed to take landing impacts) and so it is preferable to distribute more load to them, particularly on uneven surfaces.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

I'd also add that when there's a strong headwind your true airspeed goes up and you start producing lift, that lift transfers weight from the wheels to the wings, holding the elevator back raises the nose up a little putting more weight on the mains, increasing brake effectiveness.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.