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When a pilot chooses to run at a speed way above its takeoff speed on the runway in a simulator without taking off, the plane begins to skid and spins 360 uncontrollably around the yaw axis, what is the cause?

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    $\begingroup$ Simulators, especially home ones, are generally unrealistic when an airplane is in contact with the ground. $\endgroup$ – GdD May 11 '18 at 9:07
  • $\begingroup$ I take it by light you mean taildraggers? If so, check ground loops. Or on Wikipedia, is that what you have in mind? $\endgroup$ – ymb1 May 11 '18 at 11:32
  • $\begingroup$ Yes....thanks @ymb $\endgroup$ – David Teahay May 11 '18 at 12:39
  • $\begingroup$ You're welcome, based on that I found a possible duplicate. If you still have an unanswered question, feel free to specify it by editing this question. $\endgroup$ – ymb1 May 11 '18 at 13:23
  • $\begingroup$ Ok no problem.. $\endgroup$ – David Teahay May 11 '18 at 14:32
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A taildragger is more or less a shopping cart being pushed backwards, or a car driving fast in reverse. It's dynamically unstable when rolling and wants very badly to switch ends, requiring constant input to the steering.

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the prop wash from the propellers swirls around the body in the same rotation direction of the propellers and hits the rudder making it deflect a bit. for example if the propellers rotate clockwise, rudder deflect to the right and pulls the nose to the right which has to be countered by pilot's applying a bit left rudder pedal to neutralize the motion. if not counteracted, the directional deflection in the take off roll on the runway can send the plane off runway and spinning around itself in a tight radius. There is no such phenomenon in multi-engine propeller aircrafts since the rudder stays out of the propwash.

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