1
$\begingroup$

https://goo.gl/maps/WLVobn7LmuP2

I'm studying aviation and pulled up a Google Map satellite view of San Francisco International Airport (KSFO) and was wondering if someone could shed some light on what a few of the taxiway markings meant.

  1. What do the straight lines starting from the taxiway edge marking towards the "median" area mean? Probably that it's not usable for aircraft taxiing - but I couldn't find out what the name of these lines were.
  2. What is the number inside the small pink / purple used for?
  3. What are the white numbers inside the blue boxes used for?
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I find it interesting that the markings are oriented to be visible to vehicles leaving the terminal, not approaching. $\endgroup$ – BowlOfRed May 1 '18 at 2:47
2
$\begingroup$

For 1, what is slightly harder to see is that the line which runs parallel with the taxiway is a double line. This denotes the taxiway edge and the thicker lines running perpendicular to the double lines shows which side of the taxiway edge isnt suitable taxiway. They are often coloured differently too, and in SFO case the unusable part of the ramp is green.

The pink circles with black text are geographic position markings, and are used by the airports Surface Movement Guidance Control System (SMGCS) in low visibility.

The white numbers in blue squares are not are not mentioned in the FAA Standards for Airport Markings but I suspect thy might have something to do with the skybridges.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. I thought the yellow boxes with black numbers next to the taxiway centerlines were the gate numbers, and not the blue ones? $\endgroup$ – jeff0000 Apr 26 '18 at 9:20
  • $\begingroup$ @jeff0000 you know what I think you might be right. Looking now for a definitive answer. $\endgroup$ – Jamiec Apr 26 '18 at 9:47
  • $\begingroup$ The blue boxes seem to just identify each ramp area exit. Not sure why they're distinct from the SMGCS markings. $\endgroup$ – fooot Apr 26 '18 at 20:47

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.