It looks like some sort of business jet or small regional airliner, but I can't tell anything more specific than that. About the only thing I'm certain about is that it's a T-tailed twinjet with rear-mounted engines.

View of the starboard side of the aircraft in question:

a starboard-side view of the mystery aircraft

Frontal view of the aircraft's empennage: the mystery aircraft's tail, viewed from the front

Apologies for the poor lighting and resolution (especially in the first image).

  • 8
    Look what you made me do. You made me watch a Taylor Swift video! – TomMcW Apr 10 at 17:53
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    @TomMcW And yet you Swiftly returned, likely without Taylored clothing. – Michael Kjörling Apr 11 at 7:43
up vote 38 down vote accepted

According to Reddit, it is a Gulfstream G650 with the wings cut off, from a Taylor Swift music video “Look what you made me do”.

It has 8 windows like a G650, but is not a real aircraft.

  1. the engine fans don’t look right
  2. the wing leading edge has non-flush rivets and there are too many of them
  3. the window size, shape, and spacing are wrong
  4. there is no front entry door

And no one would be crazy enough to actually cut the wings off a 65 million dollar aircraft.

I don't think it is CGI because of how poorly some of the details are rendered. CGI should be more accurate.

It’s probably a Hollywood prop left over from some movie.

music video - looking towards tail Gulfstream G650 - looking towards tail Gulfstream G650 - looking towards tail music video - looking towards cockpit Gulfstream G650 - side view music video - side view, cutting the wings off music video - front view, cutting the wings off music video - front view, cutting the wings off

  • 1
    What do you mean when you say the engine fans don't look right? – Cloud Apr 10 at 10:42
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    @Cloud Feed something like "jet engine intake" to your favorite image search engine. Those blades look at least to me like they would block the air rather than draw it in, by virtue of the almost nonexistent spacing, which would mean that the engines could never function. – Michael Kjörling Apr 10 at 11:06
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    @MichaelKjörling: I thought he was referring to the fact that the fanblades on the real G650 are scimitar- or boomerang-shaped, whereas the fanblades on the "Look What You Made Me Do" G650 are completely straight. – Sean Apr 10 at 15:00
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    @Sean Possibly. I'd think some clarification from Mike in that regard would be welcome. – Michael Kjörling Apr 10 at 15:11
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    My guess is it's a damaged airframe scheduled to be cut up for scrap. In which case there would be no engines in the nacelles, so the set people would have to make fake fan blades to put in the hole. That would explain odd-looking straight blades instead of scimitar – TomMcW Apr 10 at 17:57

That appears to be a CGI rendering of a jet based upon a Gulfstream G-V or G550. It appears to have its wings or wingtips clipped off.

enter image description here

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    @VladimirF despite this probably not being a rendering, that's not a good reason: you can "dance" and do lots of other stuff on renderings, ask on movie.SE – Federico Apr 10 at 14:19
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    it's utterly commonplace to "dance on" a CGI rendering - for 15? years now. it's completely trivial to do that. – Fattie Apr 10 at 16:22
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    "A lot is technically possible, but very expensive" you are 30 years out of date, it's completely trivial now, @VladimirF – Fattie Apr 10 at 16:22
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    @CarloFelicione: compositing two real shots with green-screen is not the same thing as CGI. There's almost certainly a real plane that someone pointed a camera at, not just a fully CGI rendering of a computer model. I like @TomMcW's guess that it's a damaged airframe that would otherwise be scrap, repurposed as a movie prop. – Peter Cordes Apr 10 at 20:56
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    @Fattie having done some video editing and computer rendering, I can assure you that CGI with human interaction, changing lighting, and photorealistic reflections is far from trivial; though it is much more accessible than even 10 years ago. The official 'behind the scenes' videos show lots of green screen, but never in any scene with the airplane. After watching the airplane scenes at 1/4 speed and checking for rendering artifacts or anything 'too perfect', I'm fairly sure this was a physical model. Could've been rendered, but cheaper and faster to get this level of quality with a prop. – brichins Apr 11 at 3:12

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