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The B-25 Mitchell doesn't have a belly gunner, which would seem quite dangerous. Why didn't it have one?

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The production B-25B, B-25C, B-25D, and some B-25G models did have retractable remote control belly turrets. They were often removed in the field because they were ineffective and disliked by the crews.

The lower turret was officially deleted in the middle of the B-25G production run and continued with the B-25H and B-25J production.

More info on the B-25 here: B-25 History.org

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My research has shown that the turret was operated through a panaflex prism periscope that caused such intense vertigo and nausea in its' user that is was rarely used and often removed. In the Pacific Southwest, the turrets were immediately removed and replaced with fuel tanks to increase range and also because monsoon rains turned airfields into mud which covered the gunsight on takeoff rendering the turret useless.

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Aviation.SE! You could improve your answer by citing the sources of your research. $\endgroup$ – fooot Apr 20 '19 at 14:54
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My guess is that that conventional fighter aircraft couldn't attack from below (because they have forward-firing guns and can't fly vertically upwards) -- so belly-mounted guns are the only guns you don't need.

The Germans introduced upward-firing guns (Schräge Musik) so that they could attack from below (to take advantage of this undefended approach), but these didn't come into service until late in 1943, and (being on nightfighters) weren't discovered by the Allies for the next year or more.

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    $\begingroup$ I don't think there's any reason why "conventional" fighter couldn't attack from below. Why do you say fighters can't fly upwards? Flying straight up is not necessary - even shallow upward angle would do. Or am I missing something? $\endgroup$ – Jan Spurny Mar 14 '19 at 16:52
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    $\begingroup$ Flying upward slows you down -- for whatever reason, didn't they tend to dive from on high or something? And a shallow upward angle could be counter-attacked by other gunners in the bomber (e.g. side or rear). $\endgroup$ – ChrisW Mar 14 '19 at 17:09
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    $\begingroup$ All tactics were used. Against bombers with limited forward facing defenses (like the early B-17 models) forward head-on attacks were taught, but against bombers without belly gunners, it was no issue to burn a little energy with an upward attack for fighters like the Focke Wulf 190. Generally pilots were taught to take advantage of any blind spots, and for fast fighters, exploiting these weaknesses weren't an issue. That's why escort fighters were introduced. $\endgroup$ – Jihyun Apr 20 '19 at 19:22

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