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Do pilots of modern aircraft still need to navigate using maps, GPS and compasses to find airports?

Alternatively do they use some sort of fully automated system that navigates the aircraft via auto pilot to the airport, so you simply key in the GPS co-ordinates and it takes you there, or even better, you just type the name of the airport?

This is similar to this question that was closed as being too broad.

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    $\begingroup$ What do you consider the alternative to a GPS to be? $\endgroup$
    – abelenky
    Commented Mar 13, 2018 at 16:51
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    $\begingroup$ I do not know of any systems anymore that still require "co-ordinates". Everything from the lowest end GPS will use Airport Identifiers and Waypoint Names. $\endgroup$
    – abelenky
    Commented Mar 13, 2018 at 16:59
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    $\begingroup$ @securitydude5 - It's better to ask how do pilots navigate on modern jetliners? Because your comment hints at not knowing the answer. And I think it'll be a duplicate. $\endgroup$
    – user14897
    Commented Mar 13, 2018 at 17:00
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    $\begingroup$ this question was closed as being too broad exactly. Try this en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_navigation to narrow down the problem. $\endgroup$
    – user14897
    Commented Mar 13, 2018 at 17:21

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The preferred method of navigation on anything newer than a "six-pack" is a "Moving Map GPS", that shows the position and course of the aircraft on a map of the environment, including airspaces, airports, waypoints, and major landmarks. Many systems also show terrain, weather, and other air traffic.

Route planning is done by entering the origin, destination, and any waypoints along the way. There are however instances where plain coordinates are used, such as in oceanic flights.

When the GPS is coupled to an Autopilot, the autopilot can fly virtually the entire route other than takeoff and landing. But pilots must always be monitoring to address ATC instructions, weather, traffic or other issues.

GPS can occasionally have disruptions, so most pilots keep paper maps handy, and cockpits have a magnetic compass. Pilots should be prepared to navigate with nothing more than a map, compass and stopwatch if the need arises.

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