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More than that! She could land and take off fully loaded on 2000 meters of runway at Hawarden Airport as seen here in this video. At my local airport the runway is 2500 meters long and an Airbus A300 is not allowed to land there. Maximum Airbus A321

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    $\begingroup$ Despite its large and odd size, this plane (and similar variants like the DreamLifter), are usually very lightly loaded. Their cargo is not terribly heavy, just very large and awkward (like airplane wings, or parts of aircraft bodies). $\endgroup$ – abelenky Mar 8 '18 at 15:23
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    $\begingroup$ We should avoid judging airplanes by their looks. $\endgroup$ – user3528438 Mar 8 '18 at 15:57
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    $\begingroup$ The large fuselage probably produces a great amount of lift. Airships derived part of their lift with their body... $\endgroup$ – xxavier Mar 8 '18 at 15:58
  • $\begingroup$ Why wound't it? $\endgroup$ – Steve Kuo Mar 8 '18 at 17:50
  • $\begingroup$ I asked a similar question here: aviation.stackexchange.com/questions/49018/… $\endgroup$ – Cloud Mar 9 '18 at 18:10
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This airplane is based on the Airbus A300-600. The maximum take-off weight of the aircraft is 155 tonne as published in the wikipedia. In addition, the the manufacturer has published the Aircraft Characteristics for the base aircraft.

If we assume that the aircraft low-aerodynamic aerodynamic characteristics has not been changed for the take-off phase (which the runway length depends highly on the aircraft lift and the engine power, and considering that the wing which contributes to the lift has not been changed and engines remained the same), then we can estimate the runway length for take-off and landing from that "Aircraft Characteristics" documents.

For the aicraft at its max take-off weight, in Sea/level, the required take-off runway length is predicted as 1800 m: Take-Off performance

For the landing, the maximum landing weight is 140 tonne. Based on the document, the landing field length is 1554 m. enter image description here

It should be mentioned that these aircraft are used for transportation of another aircraft sub-assemglies, which are large and light structures, such as wing, fuselage plugs, and tails. For this reason, the take-off and landing weight will be far lower from the above mentioned values, which permits them to operate on shorter runways.

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  • $\begingroup$ The takeoff and landing weight are in tonnes, not tons. (The difference between a tonne and a US ton is about 10%! The Imperial/British ton is closer, but it's still about 2% off.) $\endgroup$ – psmears Mar 9 '18 at 8:05
  • $\begingroup$ @psmears You are correct. I have corrected the text. thank you. $\endgroup$ – Sd Hosseini Mar 9 '18 at 9:19
  • $\begingroup$ @Uraflight If you find it helpful, it would be nice to accept it :) $\endgroup$ – Stelios Adamantidis Mar 23 '18 at 14:37

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