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P.S Its just a random question...please consider the fact I have zero knowledge of aerodynamics of a plane.

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That is the normal procedure for water landings with land airplanes. You fly parallel to the water as low as possible until the flight speed is too low to carry the full weight of the airplane. If it can be done safely, however, depends on a lot more than only the landing technique. Some aircraft will not swim and the drag of the landing gear might cause the aircraft to topple over.

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  • $\begingroup$ Isn't every landing a stall? Maybe only in the last seconds but it will be a stall. In the end the stick is pulled back such that the nose raises and the wings create an air cushion with the ground on which the aircraft "falls" down on the main landing gear. For water landings it is essential that drag components, like engines, wheels etc, touch the water symmetrically, so left and right at the same time which will keep the aircraft in a straight line instead of turning and topple it over $\endgroup$ – Brilsmurfffje Mar 6 '18 at 9:28
  • $\begingroup$ @Brilsmurfffje: No, at some point the wheels carry over without the wing stalling. The best landings are imperceptible except for the wheels spinning up. Details depend on the stall behavior - some aircraft show a clear lift drop in a stall and would produce a bump when the wings refuse to carry all the lift and the aircraft drops on its wheels. $\endgroup$ – Peter Kämpf Mar 6 '18 at 13:56
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    $\begingroup$ opinions differ but a technically good landing is one that you can feel as both rear wheels toch down firmly and only once. A very soft landing is also not preferably as it can result in more wear on the tires, since they touch the groundly only slightly before the final touchdown. This result in 2 times up spinning the tire. $\endgroup$ – Brilsmurfffje Mar 6 '18 at 14:40
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    $\begingroup$ @Brilsmurfffje: Do you have any references or more arguments for that idea? It also came up a few weeks ago, and i am not quite convinced. I don't see why there would be more wear if the tires spin up slowly, it wil surely be more even though. I don't think the tires will have much time to slow down again if they spin up in two steps. $\endgroup$ – Orbit Mar 6 '18 at 16:13
  • $\begingroup$ @rickboender, "slowly" upspinning will smear the rubber over a longer distance on the runway. With crosswinds you also want a firm touchdown as it reduces the skidding over the runway and thus the wear on the tires. If you look up pictures on the internet of runways were mainly 737's land you will see longer and shorter black lines indicating smooth and firm landings respectively. $\endgroup$ – Brilsmurfffje Mar 8 '18 at 10:39

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