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I have found the need to bring to your attention the possibility of creating various crush sites and the various airports for any unpredictable events that could possibly lead to a crush. I believe that in this 21st century of our developed world we can possibly put together the technology than can hold the impact of an aeroplane which had lost total control of its engines and the last resort is to crush... Now the question is how safe can that pilot crush that flight or is there a way for the pilot to safely crush the flight with a greater possibility of survival.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Pondlife, xxavier, fooot, abelenky, SMS von der Tann Feb 4 '18 at 4:53

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In short, No

But this does warrant a bit of discussion in the spirit of a complete answer. First off the chances of losing all your engines on a commercial airliner these days is pretty slim. That being said it has happened and when it did the pilot was able to make a successful glide to a landing and whats important here is that the aircraft remained controllable. Similarly when no runway is within gliding distance forced ditching has been shown to be successful recently. In both of these cases there was no need for some kind of forced crash site. In both cases there were 0 fatalities.

In the event of a fast landing or a situation where perhaps the gear does not deploy properly or the aircraft no break system, many major runways are now equipped with EMAS to arrest the moving aircraft. This may be as close as we have to what you are asking about.

Unfortunately the major limiting factor in many accidents is loss of aircraft control either due to pilot error or aircraft malfunction. In these cases an impact zone provides no value as there is no way to get the aircraft there in the first place.

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    $\begingroup$ no break system I'd like to think there are no systems aboard an aircraft to purposefully break it. Maybe for when the chemtrail tanks are exposed? :) $\endgroup$ – Sanchises Feb 4 '18 at 20:02

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