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With the following chart I can calculate the landing distance with the headwind, gross weight and altitude. The charts uses headwind component, but how can I calculate the landing distance required if an aircraft is landing with tailwind? There is this rule of 50% for headwind and 150% for tailwind but how do i apply this with this chart?

Thanks in advance

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ To the extent it works at all, you find the distance with no headwind, and with N knots of headwind. Subtract to get the difference. Then add that difference to the distance needed with no headwind to get a rough notion of the distance needed with N knots of tailwind. Then you probably want to add at least a 20% margin for safety. $\endgroup$ – Jerry Coffin Jan 16 '18 at 22:08
  • $\begingroup$ Simply put, do not land with tailwinds. $\endgroup$ – abelenky Apr 8 '18 at 19:47
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You can’t use that chart with tailwinds - not without an expansion of the graph to include that information. Without more information from the OEM on landing distance in a tailwind I would not risk my life on a calculation derived from that chart.

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You can see that the lines of equal landing distance over wind speed are equally spaced. This means that landing distance changes linearly with wind speed. Therefore, you can (within limits) extrapolate into the tailwind range. But strictly speaking this chart does not give information about landing distances in a tailwind.

There is no magical change once wind changes to a tailwind, so an extrapolation will give you good answers for low to moderate wind speeds. However, @Carlo is right: This chart does not cover tailwind landings, so you will be outside of the performance figures established by the manufacturer.

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