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Mainland US airports all (to the best of my knowledge) have ICAO codes beginning with "K", however Alaskan airports all (from a couple of minutes rummaging about on FlightRadar24 and Flight Aware) seem to be prefixed with "P"?

Additional searching seems to indicate that Hawaiian airports are also prefixed with "P".

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    $\begingroup$ The airports in Guam, a U.S. territory also start with P. My understanding is that the K designates airports in the contiguous states of the U.S. U.S. airports in the Pacific take the P designation, those in the Atlantic (Puerto Rico) the T designation. A further delineation is that Alaska airports are PA, Hawaii airports PH, Guam airports PG, Puerto Rico airports PJ. $\endgroup$ – Terry Dec 23 '17 at 3:15
  • $\begingroup$ @Terry TJxx for Puerto Rico. $\endgroup$ – Ralph J Dec 23 '17 at 3:20
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    $\begingroup$ Sounds like you've got the makings of an answer there, @Terry... $\endgroup$ – FreeMan Dec 23 '17 at 3:21
  • $\begingroup$ Yeah, close enough to be a dupe, @RalphJ. That's what I get for not doing much searching... $\endgroup$ – FreeMan Dec 23 '17 at 3:56
  • $\begingroup$ @RalphJ Thanks for catching that. A typo on my part. $\endgroup$ – Terry Dec 23 '17 at 6:29
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Definition from wikipedia:

The ICAO (/ˌaɪˌkeɪˈoʊ/, eye-KAY-oh) airport code or location indicator is a four-letter code designating aerodromes around the world. These codes are defined by the International Civil Aviation Organization, and published in ICAO Document 7910: Location Indicators are used by air traffic control and airline operations such as flight planning.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ab/ICAO_FirstLetter.svg/1200px-ICAO_FirstLetter.svg.png

This is a map of every ICAO airport code wordwide.

Alaska has PA, PF, PO and PP as airport codes. P = Eastern North Pacific. PA=USA (Alaska) (also PF, PO and PP)

There is no special meaning behind the letter P and these codes, it's just a classification!!

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