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Can a single engine turboprop (such as a Piper Meridian or TBM) allow idling long enough to drop off a passenger or package without shutting down the engine? If so, would the prop be feathered but still spinning? Would idling with the prop not spinning (if possible) hurt the engine?

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    $\begingroup$ The question one should be asking is whether they want to incur the risk of someone running into the prop on a package or passenger drop off. The issue is really a best practices issue. However, I seem to remember the factory commenting on extended idle times for the PT6-67A but I lack any documentation on that. $\endgroup$ – mongo Oct 17 '17 at 16:29
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It's not stressful at all for a turbine engine to run at idle, you could run it until the fuel runs out. The prop is not feathered (in line with the air stream, pitch 90°) but will be at ground fine, in line with the direction of blade turn, pitch angle 0°.

There is usually no way to disconnect a propeller from a single spool turbine engine: if the engine runs, the propeller turns.

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    $\begingroup$ With the prop turning relatively slowly, you can always feather it, with the blades in line with the air stream, but not at a pitch of 90º, but somewhat less... In that way, drag will be minimized... $\endgroup$ – xxavier Oct 17 '17 at 17:10

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