1
$\begingroup$

Can a single engine turboprop (such as a Piper Meridian or TBM) allow idling long enough to drop off a passenger or package without shutting down the engine? If so, would the prop be feathered but still spinning? Would idling with the prop not spinning (if possible) hurt the engine?

$\endgroup$
1
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ The question one should be asking is whether they want to incur the risk of someone running into the prop on a package or passenger drop off. The issue is really a best practices issue. However, I seem to remember the factory commenting on extended idle times for the PT6-67A but I lack any documentation on that. $\endgroup$
    – mongo
    Oct 17, 2017 at 16:29

1 Answer 1

3
$\begingroup$

It's not stressful at all for a turbine engine to run at idle, you could run it until the fuel runs out. The prop is not feathered (in line with the air stream, pitch 90°) but will be at ground fine, in line with the direction of blade turn, pitch angle 0°.

There is usually no way to disconnect a propeller from a single spool turbine engine: if the engine runs, the propeller turns.

$\endgroup$
1
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ With the prop turning relatively slowly, you can always feather it, with the blades in line with the air stream, but not at a pitch of 90º, but somewhat less... In that way, drag will be minimized... $\endgroup$
    – xxavier
    Oct 17, 2017 at 17:10

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .