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Do airlines have to include a departure window when they file their flight plan, or communicate it otherwise?

As many people know, airlines operate on schedules, but I think we all have seen delayed flights, sometimes for 10 mins, sometimes for a couple of hours. However, that is the airline and the customer's problem. Do ATC or the Management at the airport have a departure window though, so if the plane does not depart in between these times; and it is not the airport's fault, they will not let the plane depart, or fine them?

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    $\begingroup$ Yes, they do have departure windows, but it is more for airspace congestion than the airport trying to get them off the pavement. Sometimes the destination airport may be the cause of the delay, outside the control of the originating airport or ATC. $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Oct 11 '17 at 3:46
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The estimated off block time, EOBT, which is the time at which the flight is planned to leave the gate at the departure airport, has a validity of +/-15 minutes. If the plane is not able to depart within this window, the company must send a new ATC flightplan with an updated EOBT.

In some cases a calculated takeoff time, CTOT, is issued to a flight. This is the exact time the plane must begin its takeoff roll. It is given based on airspace or airport congestion along the planned route of the flight, to prevent overload in individual ATC sectors. The flight must begin its takeoff roll within -5/+10 minutes of the CTOT. If unable to comply, a new CTOT must be requested.

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Here is a data point: about a month ago I flew AJA-CDG. We boarded on time, door was closed, and then the captain proceeded to tell us that we had to wait one hour and forty minutes for take off.

Because of storms, traffic in Paris was backlogged, and to request their slot they needed the plane to be ready for takeoff. Only then they were able to make their request to traffic control.

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  • $\begingroup$ This should be a comment, not an answer, it doesn't provide any kind of evidence to the OP's question, just a personal experience as a passenger. $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Oct 11 '17 at 14:00
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    $\begingroup$ It is evidence, unless you are calling me a liar. $\endgroup$ – Martin Argerami Oct 11 '17 at 14:22
  • $\begingroup$ Still doesn't mean it is an actual answer, it provides nothing that the OP is asking. $\endgroup$ – Rivasa Oct 11 '17 at 14:24
  • $\begingroup$ The question is "Do airlines have an ATC schedule they have to adhere to?", and I'm providing a concrete example that they do. $\endgroup$ – Martin Argerami Oct 11 '17 at 14:40

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