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I know the answer largely depends on each airline's FOM but I still wonder what the FOMs generally recommend with regard to the use of reverse thrust after landing. For example, I guess its use would be generally recommended for the accelerate-stop maneuver and also for landing on short runways.

So once again, what're their general recommendations on the use of reverse thrust after landing, if any?

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  • $\begingroup$ Not really a duplicate, the selected answers says it used on the ground, no other details. $\endgroup$ – mins Oct 4 '17 at 19:24
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The main use of Reverse on landing for big-fan engines is to kill the residual forward-thrust rather than to actually supply braking airflow. This offloads the (wheel-)brakes.

If the runway is short, then the wheel-brakes will need assistance to get the aircraft stopped in time, and then you'd use more Reverse. Some aircraft have an Intermediate Reverse click-stop, which allows you to use a standardised mid-level of Reverse; and then there's Full Reverse, but that gets noisy, which some airports don't like (especially at night).

The level of Reverse used is the P1's decision, while complying with aircraft performance on that runway, the airport's noise policy and the airline's balance between engine wear and brakes wear.

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  • $\begingroup$ The first paragraph is incorrect. Reverse thrust provides quite a bit of "braking airflow". $\endgroup$ – Ralph J Oct 4 '17 at 19:38

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