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If fuel cost and fuel efficiency were not the issue, what is the maximum speed (air speed and ground speed) that business jets or airliners could travel at without exceeding the maximum noise and sonic boom allowed or as regulated in the USA, Europe and the rest of the world. I need to know why there are no faster business jets and for business class airliners given that private and business fliers are prepared to pay a premium

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  • $\begingroup$ ...mach 1? There is no fixed ground speed, since that depends on the wind. $\endgroup$ – J. Hougaard Sep 17 '17 at 6:28
  • $\begingroup$ related, if not duplicate: aviation.stackexchange.com/q/11936/1467 & aviation.stackexchange.com/q/3748/1467 " I need to know why there are no faster business jets" you can't avoid efficiency if you want to know that. $\endgroup$ – Federico Sep 17 '17 at 6:40
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    $\begingroup$ "[...] given that private and business fliers are prepared to pay a premium" Where did you come to that conclusion? I'm sure that it is quite the opposite, nobody is going to pay a premium to shave 5-10 minutes off a short trip, and maybe 30 minutes off of an international trip. ATC can eat up or make those kinds of savings... $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Sep 17 '17 at 12:04
  • $\begingroup$ @RonBeyer for "given" read "supposing". $\endgroup$ – hobbs Sep 29 '17 at 19:40
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    $\begingroup$ I first thought the proper answer should be: Glacial speed. It will take ages for a government bureaucracy to come up with new regulations. $\endgroup$ – Peter Kämpf Sep 29 '17 at 23:21
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Business jets are developed to different rules than airliners. The biggest difference is that, indeed, fuel price and fuel efficiency are not an issue when what counts are bragging rights for the fastest plane on the ramp. Their speed has steadily increased and is now at Mach 0.935 for the fastest models. Compare that to Mach 0.78 to 0.85 for regular airliners.

Supersonic business jets were proposed several times in the last decades, but so far nobody has risked to spend the money it needs to bring one design to a type certificate.

Since supersonic flight over land is heavily restricted, the fastest speed would be Mach 0.99.

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True Air Speed limit is Mach 1. Ground speed is not relevant to this question.

The reason there are currently no flying supersonic business aircraft is that designing and building an aircraft capable of supersonic flight is very expensive and technically challenging.

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  • $\begingroup$ Mach 1 is a Mach limit. Since speed of sound depends on temperature, the true air speed limit varies with altitude. $\endgroup$ – Jan Hudec Sep 30 '17 at 21:37
  • $\begingroup$ Mach 1 is expressed in knots in aviation and that number is adjusted for altitude. Mach numbers are constants. So to avoid noise restrictions you have to fly at or below Mach 1, which can be any range of speeds depending on your altitude. So, your True Air Speed has to be below that of Mach 1 at the altitude you are flying. That's why I refer to it as the limit, because just saying you have to fly below Mach 1 doesn't really mean anything in and of itself. $\endgroup$ – Juan Jimenez Oct 1 '17 at 10:23
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It is 0.99 Mach over land. I don't see any restrictions over the ocean. Based on the top answer to this aviation SE question, I think if you can design a more stealthy hypersonic transport aircraft and fly it at high enough altitudes in the stratosphere, you may minimize the sonic boom to the extent that it is a non-issue. The NASA graph in the answer shows that the XR-71 has an insignificant sonic boom when cruising at 60,000 ft MSL compared to the Concord SST.

Ram-jet technology would eliminate the need for the turbine compressor used on current jet engines thus allowing the aircraft to be quieter and more streamlined and stealthier.

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