3
$\begingroup$

enter image description here

29 is the visual flight track in this chart. Why is it depicted from the MAP to the threshold of the runway? Does it signify some alternative procedures pilots are expected to perform if they decide not to perform a missed approach at the MAP?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ What is the image source? $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Sep 11 '17 at 19:00
  • $\begingroup$ @Ron Beyer I googled it but you can find it from the chart legend in the Jeppesen Airway Manual $\endgroup$ – lemonincider Sep 11 '17 at 20:02
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Looks like it's a non-precision approach (since it shows MDA) so I think you can stay at that altitude until you see the runway. It's not like a DA where you go missed if you can't see it right away. I could be wrong,though $\endgroup$ – TomMcW Sep 11 '17 at 20:06
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @TomMcW Thank you for your answer but that can't be true. If you don't have the runway in sight after you have reached the MDA, you should initiate the missed approach at the missed approach point, which is depicted as "M" on the chart. You simply cannot stay at the MDA once you go past the MAP $\endgroup$ – lemonincider Sep 15 '17 at 22:33
3
$\begingroup$

From the Jeppesen chart legend PDF:

Visual flight track is shown when the missed approach point is prior to the runway threshold.

So this depiction is when the MAP is before (and not at) the threshold.

enter image description here

FAA style:

enter image description here
(airnav)

It's quite hard finding an early MAP, but here it is above as depicted by the FAA. It means to expect a visual segment as shown above when/if continuation below the visual descent point is not approved.

I also found this very nice read: Where To Start The Missed Approach

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ This definitely answers what it is, but the question seems to be more about why it's there, i.e. how does it help the pilot? $\endgroup$ – Pondlife Sep 18 '17 at 15:12
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ True. My question was more about the purpose of the track than about what it is. But after reading your answer, I gave my question another thought and I guess I've found an answer to it. If the visual track is depicted whenever the MAP and the threshold do not match, I guess it's to remind the pilots that they have to fly visual from the MAP to the threshold if they've decided to land. The meaning would have been clearer if the visual track was directed down to the threshold, but I guess it's depicted the way it is to prevent pilots from mistaking the MAP as a VDP. Thank you $\endgroup$ – lemonincider Sep 18 '17 at 15:46
  • $\begingroup$ Let me know if you have a different idea $\endgroup$ – lemonincider Sep 18 '17 at 15:50
  • $\begingroup$ @lemonincider - that's what I had in mind, I'll find an FAA chart to compare, it's quite likely a different way of depicting the same information but in a clear manner like you said. $\endgroup$ – ymb1 Sep 18 '17 at 15:57
  • $\begingroup$ @Pondlife check now $\endgroup$ – ymb1 Sep 18 '17 at 16:54

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.