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I have recently bought a N-REG C172 in Italy since 2008 and in fact I have been told by the Italian NAA that my EASA License will be valid limited for flights in Italy. I understand if I wish to fly in other EU countries I should apply for a FAA "Restricted like" License which I can obtain symply by giving a short english language check in recognized FAA offices in Italy. Any Idea about this "restricted" option? Whom should I ask to get more info?

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    $\begingroup$ Why would the FAA have offices in Italy? $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Sep 5 '17 at 23:17
  • $\begingroup$ Why would you not just have your plane registered in Italy? $\endgroup$ – TomMcW Sep 6 '17 at 20:18
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The license they are talking about is an FAA license issues on the basis of your Italian one, provided that license is up to an FAA standard. See @Pondlife's answer for some links, and here's one on the AOPA website.

The FAA license would be restricted to the privileges of your Italian one. For example, if you do not have privileges to fly at night on your Italian license then you would not be able to fly at night. If your Italian license defines the day as being shorter than the FAA you'd have to use the Italian definition.

To get one you have to show up in person at an FSDO unless the Italian FAA equivalent has an agreement in place where they can validate identity, etc.

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I don't know what an FAA "restricted" license is, but I guess it may be a foreign-based license issued under 14 CFR 61.75; see this answer for more information.

It's an FAA private license that's linked to your Italian one and it gives you all the privileges of a regular FAA private license, including operating N-reg aircraft anywhere in the world. But note that if your Italian license has more restrictions than the FAA one (e.g. no night flying) then you still have to obey those restrictions.

The process to get one is described here but I believe you have to physically visit an FAA office in the USA to get it.

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  • $\begingroup$ In the meantime that's exactly what I've been told by an ENAC (NAA Italy) inspector. $\endgroup$ – Luk Bolcati Sep 7 '17 at 4:40
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I'm just back from FSDO in Hempstead near NYC with my temporary license and would like to give a feedback to anyone interested.

  1. follow instruction @ https://www.faa.gov/licenses_certificates/airmen_certification/foreign_license_verification/
  2. obtain verification letter from FAA
  3. Schedule a meeting with your FSDO inspector
  4. follow instruction given by FSDO to log in application @ IACRA website https://iacra.faa.gov/IACRA/Default.aspx
  5. when visiting take your IACRA credentials with you + logbook + license and medical certification
  6. During the meeting at FAA-FSDO you are required to complete your application in front of the FAA inspector and electronically sign (that's why you need your credentials) and prove your Logbook registrered hours as well show original Medical certificate and License, FAA will aslo verify your English knowledge ,in my case a nice conversation about general subjects with the two FAA gentlemen I had in front of me
  7. You will finally be issued a Temporary permit valid 120days
  8. Your definitive "restricted" FAA License will be delivered to your home address within 90days
  9. Your license will give you a permit to fly an N aircraft only where your original License is considered valid (Europe) and according to ratings and limitations of your original license
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I suggest you to double check the information that "EASA License will be valid limited for flights in Italy". Is that specifically mandated by the FAA? Here in Italy is absolutely commonplace to have D and G registered aircrafts and fly them, also internationally, with EASA or Italian licenses.

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    $\begingroup$ D- (Germany) and G- (UK) registered aircraft are from EASA member states. N- (USA) registered aircraft are not only subject to EASA regulations when they fly in Europe, but also to FAA regulations. As far as I know, the FAA only allows operations of an N- registered aircraft on an FAA license or on a license of the country the aircraft is being operated in. So if you fly an N-registered aircraft in Italy, you have to have either an FAA license or an Italian license. If you then fly into France, you have to have either an FAA license or a French license. See the problem? $\endgroup$ – DeltaLima Sep 6 '17 at 11:38
  • $\begingroup$ Thankyou for the clarification. Has the problem of multiple states sharing the very same licensing body been clarified by the FAA? From this point of view we are becoming the "united states of europe", it soon will not really make sense anymore to talk of italian or french license. $\endgroup$ – Caterpillaraoz Sep 6 '17 at 12:25
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    $\begingroup$ @Caterpillaraoz that might be a decent question to ask. $\endgroup$ – Federico Sep 6 '17 at 12:44
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    $\begingroup$ @Caterpillaraoz Yes it has, see this question and read the comments: voretaq7 asked the FAA for an interpretation and they confirmed it. $\endgroup$ – Pondlife Sep 10 '17 at 22:09
  • $\begingroup$ @Pondlife Thanks! $\endgroup$ – Caterpillaraoz Sep 12 '17 at 6:43

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