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Do airlines in the US or UK have to pay fuel taxes?

When looking at Jet-A prices on the Shell website, for example, it's unclear if the listed prices include taxes. Do they?

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  • $\begingroup$ Why do you believe they wouldn't be subject to local and federal taxes? $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Jul 17 '17 at 23:27
  • $\begingroup$ Have you seen this and this (and perhaps this)? $\endgroup$ – mins Jul 18 '17 at 6:37
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    $\begingroup$ @mins your second link is 14 years old, tax rules can and do change more often than that. The third took me to a site giving guidance on when to use capital letters. Also the way your comment is worded is highly obnoxious. $\endgroup$ – Notts90 Jul 18 '17 at 9:20
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    $\begingroup$ @Notts90: I didn't want to elaborate on that, but since you ask... well, this question indeed shows no research at all, for that it could be downvoted, I didn''t. It is also expected US/UK are correctly written, it's a modest effort. $\endgroup$ – mins Jul 18 '17 at 19:44
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In the US, yes.

Kerosene [for use in aviation] is taxed at $0.244 per gallon unless a reduced rate applies.

These taxes mainly fund airport and Air Traffic Control operations by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), of which commercial aviation is the biggest user (Fuel taxes in the United States).

More information from taxfoundation.org.


In the UK, it depends on the user.

Aviation turbine fuel used for private pleasure flying: £0.5795 per litre

Aviation gasoline (Avgas): £0.3770 per litre

Air transport is exempt.

Furthermore:

Article 24 of the [1944 Convention of International Civil Aviation] requires all contracting states not to charge duty on aviation fuel already on board any aircraft that has arrived in their territory from another contracting state. Further to this, the exemption of airlines from national taxes and customs duties on a range of aviation-related goods, including parts, stores and fuel is a standard element of the network of bilateral ‘Air Service Agreements’ (ASAs) between individual countries.

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protected by Community Aug 29 '17 at 8:39

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