5
$\begingroup$

I know this is a basic question, but a lot of Q&As on here talk about being "under the hood" to simulate IMC.

My question is, is this a literal hood? Can someone please explain what this actually means to a non-pilot?

$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Here is what most IFR hoods look like, you can also look up things like "Foggles". $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Jul 10 '17 at 21:39
  • $\begingroup$ It's not exactly a hood, more of a specially shaped visor, or your instructor can stick a map on the window. $\endgroup$ – GdD Jul 10 '17 at 22:19
  • $\begingroup$ @GdD you're kidding with the map, right? Because that's no longer simulated IMC... $\endgroup$ – egid Jul 11 '17 at 0:19
  • $\begingroup$ Not joking @egid, it was only the part in front of me, the other side was kept clear so the instructor could see. It worked. $\endgroup$ – GdD Jul 11 '17 at 6:12
  • $\begingroup$ I see. I'm fairly certain that is not legal in the eyes of the FAA. $\endgroup$ – egid Jul 11 '17 at 18:29
8
$\begingroup$

When you read or hear the term "under the hood" as it relates to simulated IMC, it may or may not be an actual hood. The FAA does not require a hood, instead the FAA calls for a "view limiting device." Often the view limiting device used is a hood such as the ones depicted below. However, other view limiting devices can also be used, such as glasses with an opaque coating that limits your view such as the ones depicted in the last picture below the hoods.

Checkout this "superhood" at Sporty's!

enter image description here

This is the type I used for my IFR certificate back in the day.

enter image description here

This is another type of view limiting device that can be used to simulate IMC. It is commonly still referred to as "under the hood" or as "hood-word", but as you can see these are not a hood. There is a name brand of glasses like these called "foggles." And most people refer to these as "foggles", although, these, are a different brand. enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
5
$\begingroup$

Yes, old style view limiting devices were typically a light plastic hat like device, which was translucent, to simulate clouds I suppose. It was typically on a pivot so it could still be worn while the view was not limited. It was called a hood.

Today a popular replacement is white with a clear cutout for viewing instruments, and it fits on glasses or sunglasses. Foggles are more common, and I have students make them out of safety glasses. Newer view limiting wear was less expensive, and tends to work better with headsets than a traditional hood.

Years ago, I used a pair of industrial safety glasses with translucent tape, to be my view limiting device. I also put translucent tape on the side shields They were more comfortable than what was commercially available for pilots at the time.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ The old hoods were rather sophisticated with adjustable headbands and flipping hoods, and a price to match. $\endgroup$ – mongo Jul 11 '17 at 6:04
3
$\begingroup$

With this one, everything was under the hood.

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ That's a good looking Link Trainer! Is it operational? I crashed ours a couple of time in cadets. :( $\endgroup$ – Ryan The Leach Jul 11 '17 at 8:04
  • $\begingroup$ They have it cordoned off and I wasn't allowed to inspect it, but I was told that it is completely restored and operational. I like the wings :) $\endgroup$ – Koyovis Jul 11 '17 at 9:01
2
$\begingroup$

Yes, most pilots practice flying in simulated instrument condition using a view limiting device, sometimes in the form of a hood, though the newer translucent eyeglasses e.g. Foggles, etc are becoming more and more popular for this purpose.

Another method which is preferred by the US military and other militaries are out the world for instrument training is a retractable curtain which covers all the windows or canopy enclosures in an aircraft, preventing the student pilot from looking outside the airplane.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ AIUI civilian simulated instrument flight requires a safety pilot who can look out for vfr aircraft in the area. It seems to me (as a non-pilot) that this would effectively rule out the curtain approach. $\endgroup$ – Peter Green Jul 11 '17 at 11:34
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Not if you're doing it in a T-38 with the student in the back seat under the shroud. $\endgroup$ – Carlo Felicione Jul 11 '17 at 11:57
  • $\begingroup$ Some air forces also have (had?) lead-lined curtains for their nuclear bombers to protect the crew from radiation. $\endgroup$ – David Richerby Jul 11 '17 at 12:00
  • $\begingroup$ I don't know about lead lined, but they did have curtains to p protect the crews from flash blindness when a nuclear weapon detonated. $\endgroup$ – Carlo Felicione Jul 11 '17 at 15:10

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.