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I file VFR flight plans all the time, now that 1800wxbrief.com makes it so easy to open and close them.

Opening is easy, just click the activate button, but when it's time to close the flight plan, you have to type in your arrival airport. Of what value is that particular piece of information to FSS? Is there a historical reason why they request it?

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    $\begingroup$ I'm guessing if your arrival airport is different from your planned destination, they may need to advice your planned destination that you are no longer coming $\endgroup$ – expeditedescent Jun 20 '17 at 18:30
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In the past, when run by the feds, the FSS responsible for the destination airport held the responsibility for making phone calls and alerting SAR. So if you wanted to cancel a flight plan, it was essential to determine what FSS your plan needed to be cancelled at. That was established by the destination airport.

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My understanding is that providing multiple pieces of information related to your flight plan when communicating is to ensure that the correct flight plan is being manipulated.

It seems odd that it would be required on an electronic format, but what if your N-number is N1234RF and a person closing the flight plan types N1234EF?

There is potential to close the wrong flight plan. Now the likelihood of both of those N-numbers having an active flight plan to the same destination and having someone fat-finger it at the same time is much less likely, obviously.

Also, "if you are flying to multiple airports this function provides a chance to confirm which of the flight plans you are using. Ex. a student pilot flying from their Home airport to airport A, taking a break then flying onto airport B before flying back home." - Dawn Breaker

So it is just a cross-reference for accuracy.

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  • $\begingroup$ I would add that if you are flying to multiple airports this function provides a chance to confirm which of the flight plans you are using. Ex. a student pilot flying from their Home airport to airport A, taking a break then flying onto airport B before flying back home. $\endgroup$ – Dawn Breaker Jun 21 '17 at 0:23
  • $\begingroup$ As a matter of trivia, I do not think N123JRF meets the US criteria for an N number. The limit is two alphabetics, unless the rules have changed. $\endgroup$ – mongo Jun 21 '17 at 1:01

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