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Can you push the throttle forward while using reverse thrusters (for turbofans)? Does this have any effect, such as strengthen the "reverse" air blanket? Is it ever used?

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    $\begingroup$ What type of aircraft are you asking about? $\endgroup$
    – Simon
    Jun 18 '17 at 20:29
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    $\begingroup$ I had some popular commercial turbofans in mind. E.g.: 737, 747, 777, 787, 320, 330, 350, 380. I've edited the question to specify. $\endgroup$
    – TayE
    Jun 18 '17 at 20:47
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On typical Boeing throttles, this example being a 737NG but similar on all Boeings, the reverse thrust levers must be lifted to engage reverse. In order to do this, the thrust levers must be in the idle gate and cannot be advanced until the reverse thrust levers as stowed. The reverse levers engage locks in the thrust levers. In this video, at 2:50, you can see the thrust levers being retarded to idle, then the reverse thrust levers being pulled up. At 3:22 they are stowed.

In this video from an A321, you can see that the Airbus system is very similar.

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    $\begingroup$ Is it possible to reduce the reverse thrust by pulling the reverse levels up halfway? Or must they be fully engaged to work at all? $\endgroup$
    – TayE
    Jun 19 '17 at 6:35
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    $\begingroup$ The Airbus system does not strike me as particularly similar. $\endgroup$
    – Jan Hudec
    Jun 20 '17 at 21:36
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In the B757 aircraft (RR engines), for example, the "reverse" thrust levers can only be raised/employed when the aircraft is on the ground and the "forward" thrust levers are in the idle stop position. During reverse thrust operation, the forward thrust levers cannot be pushed forward.

This is different than many Turboprop airplanes

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Yes. In reverse thrust, at idle, there is no effective thrust. Advancing the throttle provides beta thrust.

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  • $\begingroup$ Is it normally advanced all the way? $\endgroup$
    – TayE
    Jun 18 '17 at 20:15
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    $\begingroup$ On which aircraft? I've never heard of beta thrust. Are you perhaps thinking of beta on turboprop aircraft? On Boeings and Airbus, advancing the thrust levers will stow the reversers. $\endgroup$
    – Simon
    Jun 18 '17 at 20:21
  • $\begingroup$ Cessna 208B for a turboprop example. $\endgroup$
    – mongo
    Jun 18 '17 at 20:26
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    $\begingroup$ I assume that the OP is asking about turbofans and turbojets. We need to clarify. $\endgroup$
    – Simon
    Jun 18 '17 at 20:29
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    $\begingroup$ Okay, I didn't see your qualification of when the reversers are deployed as to whether there is effective thrust in your answer. I don't know whether all 4 engines on the 747 with reversers deployed will start the airplane rolling, so I have deleted my comment. Sorry about that. I used to occasionally back up the 727. It always took a burst of power to break away, and then we reduced power considerably but I can't remember whether we went all the way to idle and kept moving. $\endgroup$
    – Terry
    Jun 18 '17 at 20:58

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