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This news story shows video of fuel being expelled from a wingtip of a 767, while at the gate. The engines were apparently running during this event. After the cockpit crew learned of what was going on, the engines were shut down and fire equipment was brought in.

Since this happened on the ground, is this an incident that must be reported to the FAA? The article says that the airline hasn't given any details of the incident.

Perhaps this belongs in another question, but what could have happened here?

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  • $\begingroup$ It looks like somebody hit the fuel-discharge switch, which would be surprising since I believe that the discharge system is a set of guarded switches. It may also be that the fueling system vents are at the same place and somebody overfilled the tanks. $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Jun 16 '17 at 0:33
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, this really should be two questions. One about the reporting requirements, and one about a possible explanation. I didn't even notice the second question until I was done writing my answer! $\endgroup$ – Lnafziger Jun 16 '17 at 3:25
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There are a couple of places in the regualtions that require FAA or NTSB notification of certain events:

The closest thing to what you described would be the following in 121.703(a):

(11) A fuel or fuel-dumping system that affects fuel flow or causes hazardous leakage during flight;

Note that it says during flight though, so this wouldn't apply and they wouldn't be required to report it.

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