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Was it the McDonnell Voodoo or the Lockheed F-104A?

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    $\begingroup$ There is no question in the body and you seem to have answered the title question yourself. What exactly are you asking? $\endgroup$ – Simon May 29 '17 at 19:11
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    $\begingroup$ Mach 2 at what altitude? And in what flight regime? Controlled horizontal, dive, uncontrolled? $\endgroup$ – jwenting May 30 '17 at 6:09
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According to the Federation of American Scientists website on the F-104, it was the first aircraft to fly at twice the speed of sound, and held numerous speed and altitude records. The website claims a max speed of Mach 2.2 at 35,000 feet. The same website credits the Voodoo with being the first aircraft to exceed 1000 mph in level flight, and gives a max speed of 1095 mph. However, an altitude is not quoted for this speed, so it's not possible to translate to a Mach number. At sea level, 1095 mph is Mach 1.44, and increases at higher altitudes. Note that even assuming the Voodoo could fly at its top speed of 1095mph at 35,000ft, that is still slower than the 104, for which Mach 2.2 works out at 1450 mph. See FAS

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The airplane would be the J79 powered F-104 Starfighter.

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    $\begingroup$ A reference or explanation of why this is the answer would be helpful. $\endgroup$ – DJClayworth May 30 '17 at 2:30
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    $\begingroup$ depending on requirements, it could be the F-8 or F-101 both of which could probably hit Mach 2 in a dive... Maybe the F-100 could as well, haven't been able to find references for that. $\endgroup$ – jwenting May 30 '17 at 6:49

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