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I'm from Brazil, and here we use the West/East rule, so we use an odd flight level when we fly between 0/360 - 179, and when we fly between 180 - 359 we fly in an even flight level.

But what should you do in other countries? Where I can find those rules?

I've heard that in Europe it's totally different, and that in some countries in Asia they use meters, instead of feet.

Where can I find this information?

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    $\begingroup$ You should be able to find this information in the AIP of the country in question, but were you looking for a place where this information was collated together? $\endgroup$ – Qantas 94 Heavy Dec 18 '13 at 1:29
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    $\begingroup$ Interesting fact: in most European countries the transition altitude is around 5000ft which is a surprise to many FAA pilots. $\endgroup$ – Philippe Leybaert Dec 18 '13 at 2:59
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    $\begingroup$ The transition altitude can even be as low as 3000 feet. There has been talk of standardisation for some time now. Unfortunately, it requires European countries to agree on something trivial. $\endgroup$ – Marcks Thomas Dec 18 '13 at 11:30
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    $\begingroup$ Negative, the Russians and Chinese use meters. An interesting MD11 feature, is that you can set on the MCP both measure units (feets or meters), so is easier to deal with the flight levels. Other airlines that fly in that regions, give conversion tables for the pilots, so there is a lowest possibility of errors. $\endgroup$ – Ygor Montenegro Dec 18 '13 at 19:30
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    $\begingroup$ @YgorMontenegro - You're right, my mistake. Except Russia and most former Soviet states started using feet above transition altitude in 2011 when they started using RVSM. $\endgroup$ – xpda Feb 8 '14 at 18:51
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Every country's Civil Aviation Authority issues an Aeronautical Information Publication (AIP) as part of their Aeronautical Information Services (AIS) which contains the information you are looking for. Most likely the information about Flight Level rules will be contained in the GEN (General) or ENR (En-Route) section. For Europe, most information from the AIP's can be found through the European AIS Database

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