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While staying at Premier Inn, next to Abu Dhabi International Airport (AUH/OMAA), I was more than surprised to find out warning signs that I'm strictly prohibited from taking photos of the nearby airport form the hotel's roof pool.

Can someone explain me, why such regulations are still in place or how do they aid to airport security, if everything (what I'm banned from photographing from this distance) is perfectly pictured, in a far better details, in Google Maps?

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    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this is better asked on Travel.SE. It has little to do with aviation (the same is true of oil refineries for example) and much to do with culture and history. $\endgroup$ – Simon Apr 5 '17 at 19:04
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    $\begingroup$ If you're so certain that this fits better for Travel.SE then why you don't flag it for a migration instead of closing? This is the second time this happens to me on this site. A bit weird. I was told that migration is far better across SE than closing questions and asking them again on the other site. $\endgroup$ – trejder Apr 5 '17 at 19:06
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    $\begingroup$ This would almost certainly be off-topic on Travel. Why are such regulations in place? Because the government decided, if it's the law, or the hotel decided, if it's their policy. We don't know why the government or hotel decided to do such an illogical thing. (Well, it might make sense for the hotel: a crowd of people with cameras around the pool might be off-putting for people who want to use the pool. But that would be pure speculation.) $\endgroup$ – David Richerby Apr 5 '17 at 19:10
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    $\begingroup$ I wouldn't want to put words into @Simon 's mouth but it's a cultural question because some jurisdictions choose to prohibit taking photos of planes and airports, whereas others have no problem with it. Some cultures are fine with people taking photographs of publicly visible things; others view it as some kind of problem. $\endgroup$ – David Richerby Apr 5 '17 at 19:12
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    $\begingroup$ @Simon It's been my experience as a regular user of Travel questions along the lines of "Why is X illegal in country Y?" and "Why does company C have policy P?" are held to be off-topic since, in general, there's no single objective reason and, especially in the case of company policies, the actual reasons are usually not known to the public. As for not wanting to flag, flags are precisely for drawing the moderators' attention to things that only they can do. $\endgroup$ – David Richerby Apr 5 '17 at 19:42
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I believe the sign is to prevent plane watchers from gathering at the spot and taking pictures of every aircraft taking off or landing, which, judging by the existence of the sign, is not how the location is intended to be used.

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    $\begingroup$ It's much more than that. In most of the Middle East, it is illegal to photograph any area, building or facility considered of military importance or having a high security risk. Those no photography signs are enforceable. $\endgroup$ – Simon Apr 5 '17 at 19:50
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    $\begingroup$ @Simon not just in the Middle East, in most of the world. This went so far in the USSR we were told to not take photos inside the cabin of civilian airliners because we might inadvertently capture a glimpse of some equipment or (through the window) a postage stamp sized image of a military base 10km below us. At the time, even photographing road bridges and policeman directing traffic at intersections was illegal there. $\endgroup$ – jwenting Apr 6 '17 at 7:34
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    $\begingroup$ If you go to plane watching sites there's a lot of discussion about US airports that have problems with photography. Although there are no laws about it that I know of, airports are generally private property and airport security often has a pickle in their butts about people standing at the fence with a camera. $\endgroup$ – TomMcW Apr 6 '17 at 18:21
  • $\begingroup$ My question and this answer brought so much attention and so many valuable, pure-aviation comments, that I still don't get it, how or why this question is off-topic here. $\endgroup$ – trejder Apr 7 '17 at 10:05

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