17
$\begingroup$

From flight simulation and from pictures, it appears that the cockpit of the A318, A319, A320, and A321 have few if any differences.

  • Could an A320 pilot fly an A321 without further training?
  • If not, how much training would he need? Maybe he has to practice landing, because of the different length of the aircraft.
  • What big differences in the cockpit do those planes have?
$\endgroup$
30
$\begingroup$

From Flight Training International:

Airbus A320 Type Rating

  • The Airbus A320 family of jet airliners consists of five aircraft: the A318, A319, A320, A321 jet airliners and ACJ business jet.
  • Only one type rating is required to fly these Airbus aircraft, as they have similar flight decks.
  • To earn a type rating for these Airbus aircraft requires the completion of a technical course that lasts anywhere from 8 to 12 days depending on your pace.

So the answer from a regulatory point would be no additional training. Some airlines might have policies that require a minimal check, probably in a sim.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ "Some airlines might have policies that require a minimal check, probably in a sim." Do you happen to have a source with this? $\endgroup$ – Mast Apr 1 '17 at 14:36
  • $\begingroup$ @Mast Not as direct example of where it is required. I state is a possibility as each airline operating under Part 121 (in the US) is required to have a training program defined and approved by the FAA. The requirements for the program are covered in Part 121, Subpart N. These allow for significant variation between airlines as long as they meet the minimums. $\endgroup$ – Gerry Apr 1 '17 at 18:23
13
$\begingroup$

As the typerating is a A318/19/20/21 typerating you are allowed to fly the whole A320 series without further training.

$\endgroup$
8
$\begingroup$

Could an A320 pilot fly an A321 without further training?

Legally, yes. Airlines may want a check ride to make sure the pilots are aware of the correct rotation angles—A321 tail-strikes around 12°.

If not, how much training would he need? Maybe he has to practice landing, because of the different length of the aircraft.

Depends on the airline, but probably that (in a simulator—you don't take a transport jet out just for training).

What big differences in the cockpit do those planes have?

A placard somewhere.

A321-100 will have different fuel system switches, because it's tanks are not split to inboard and outboard. A321-200, the one with winglets, should have the same wing—and fuel system—as the rest of the series.

Engine instruments show different values depending on what engines you have (RR and IAE ones show EPR, the others show N1), but that is just the symbols on the screen.

There may also still be some early aircraft around that still have CRT displays with slightly different graphics—the graphics was simplified with switch to LCDs.

That's about all differences there are.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.