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This question already has an answer here:

Purchase price. Not total cost of ownership.

This Aviation Question inspired mine.

A quote From this article in Flying Magazine (Dated 2012):

Cessna is holding the line on pricing, but the new models still aren’t cheap. The 180 hp 172S, referred to by Cessna as the 172-SP goes for \$307,500 the 160 hp 172R sells for \$274,900.


Many years ago I heard this generalization: "half the cost of an airplane is litigation." And sure, I understand you should not replace a control surface cable with one from Home Depot. But still, these prices are breathtaking.

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marked as duplicate by Ron Beyer, Community Mar 30 '17 at 22:40

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • $\begingroup$ Yeah, this is probably a dupe. Question title words just didn't get that hit I guess $\endgroup$ – radarbob Mar 30 '17 at 22:36
  • $\begingroup$ Just as an FYI, club/group ownership is another option to look at. Really spreads out the ownership costs and makes things affordable. I bought my "share" of a very well equipped, 1978 Cessna 177B Cardinal II for less than $8k. My cost per hour (wet) is less than the local school charges for its 152, and the airplane see's maybe 50 hours a year by all members. $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Mar 30 '17 at 22:48
  • $\begingroup$ In reading the earlier answer: I get a sense of a self fulfilling prophecy. Low volume because they cost too much. Then there's Less mgr. liability now. Then How many times does a 50 yr old design get certified anyway? Upgraded radio? How much certitude does that take? There's more gone into my car that a C-172 I think. Its not rocket surgery. $\endgroup$ – radarbob Mar 30 '17 at 22:48
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    $\begingroup$ A lot of it is self-fulfilling prophecy. Also bear in mind that for your typical light GA single (say the Cessna 172 from your example) the purchase audience isn't generally individuals: They're selling these things to major flight training programs - often for much less than the "sticker price". Straight-line depreciation on a working airplane & the money they'll make when they sell it off in their next fleet refresh help soften the blow. $\endgroup$ – voretaq7 Mar 31 '17 at 8:34