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The pros and cons of each are all over the internet. Price and flexibility, which of the two routes looks better when applying for an airline regional or legacy, does it matter? More importantly which better prepares you?

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    $\begingroup$ There is no concrete answer to your question, only opinion. As a person who has hired pilots into single engine piston to twin turboprops (charter world): absolutely nobody cares. Take the most affordable route that gets you to revenue in the least amount of time. I found this to be pt61 because it let me build aggressive timelines for training. 141 was too regimented and the ground school sessions were just something I would do anyway on my own for free. If you need structure then 141 may be better. If you want to design your own timeline then 61 may be better. $\endgroup$ – acpilot Mar 4 '17 at 2:00
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    $\begingroup$ Also, the minimum times quoted by virtually every flight school are waaaay too optimistic for a typical training schedule and student. $\endgroup$ – acpilot Mar 4 '17 at 2:01
  • $\begingroup$ One big difference is that going to a flight school as part of a two or four year degree at many approved colleges can reduce the flight time you need before getting an ATP. $\endgroup$ – J Walters Mar 4 '17 at 4:41
  • $\begingroup$ I do not agree the question should be closed as "primarily opinion based". To the OP, the difference between part 61 and part 141 is unclear, hence the question. If both choices are equally acceptable, then the answer to the question should be "it does not matter". $\endgroup$ – kevin Mar 4 '17 at 7:35
  • $\begingroup$ Regarding the degree, go for a non-aviation major. Knock out your ratings through your CFI and instruct your junior and senior years. Easily doable if you have the money or loans. $\endgroup$ – acpilot Mar 4 '17 at 16:02
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Either one is fine, though I'd make sure you seek a good instructor for a part 61 and follow a part 141 syllabus (available through ASA, Jeppesen, King Schools, etc.) when you do yours to verify you covered all the bases.

At that stage of your training, future employers really won't care that much whether you did your training as a 61 or 141 student. They are going to be much more concerned with your professional flying record and later certification and checkrides.

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