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This question already has an answer here:

What are the differences between types I, II, and III emergency doors?

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marked as duplicate by Manu H, Carlo Felicione, Simon, ymb1, vasin1987 Feb 13 '17 at 17:40

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • $\begingroup$ this helps? aviation.stackexchange.com/q/12830/1467 $\endgroup$ – Federico Feb 12 '17 at 7:25
  • $\begingroup$ The answer suggested by @Federico mentions this FAR: §25.807 Emergency exits for the US/FAA. $\endgroup$ – mins Feb 12 '17 at 9:09
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    $\begingroup$ Not exactly a duplicate, this question is only for emergency doors, and not limited to the US. $\endgroup$ – mins Feb 12 '17 at 10:48
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The major difference is size.

FAR part 25.801 defines them as:

(1) Type I. This type is a floor-level exit with a rectangular opening of not less than 24 inches wide by 48 inches high, with corner radii not greater than eight inches.

(2) Type II. This type is a rectangular opening of not less than 20 inches wide by 44 inches high, with corner radii not greater than seven inches. Type II exits must be floor-level exits unless located over the wing, in which case they must not have a step-up inside the airplane of more than 10 inches nor a step-down outside the airplane of more than 17 inches.

(3) Type III. This type is a rectangular opening of not less than 20 inches wide by 36 inches high with corner radii not greater than seven inches, and with a step-up inside the airplane of not more than 20 inches. If the exit is located over the wing, the step-down outside the airplane may not exceed 27 inches.

There is also a type IV:

(4) Type IV. This type is a rectangular opening of not less than 19 inches wide by 26 inches high, with corner radii not greater than 6.3 inches, located over the wing, with a step-up inside the airplane of not more than 29 inches and a step-down outside the airplane of not more than 36 inches.

If you read the full text, you will also find definitions for ventral and tailcone exits. For pictures I refer you to this answer.

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