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I would like to know if this is a Boeing or an Airbus. Maybe there is an Aviation Wizard out there. It's an EasyJet plane.

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ I've just joined to ask; why are you concerned about the plane manufacturer and not "what the hell are they doing taping up the engine?" $\endgroup$ – Darren Feb 3 '17 at 15:31
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    $\begingroup$ an even more important question is "what is that pile of loose, silver colored stuff sitting inside the nacelle, and will our intrepid duct-taper clean it out before FOD?" $\endgroup$ – FreeMan Feb 3 '17 at 15:49
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    $\begingroup$ @Darren I've been here for quite a while and I'm wondering the same thing... Noah, this would seem to be counter-evidence to your article title. :P $\endgroup$ – reirab Feb 3 '17 at 17:29
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    $\begingroup$ @FreeMan Maybe it's a T-1000? $\endgroup$ – reirab Feb 3 '17 at 17:31
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    $\begingroup$ @NoahFisher All aircraft will at sometime have speed tape (as used here on the outside) and duct tape (frequently used on the inside). I have never worked on or flown an aircraft that doesn't have tape holding something together. It's not a "bodge" job. They are recognised materials for approved repairs and are not an indication of either the quality of the aircraft or the quality of the maintenance. $\endgroup$ – Simon Feb 3 '17 at 18:27
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There's no need to be an aviation wizard - Easyjet only fly Airbus A319 and A320 aircraft.

Even if you didn't give the airline, I would guess that it is an A320. Comparing the size of the engine to the person suggests it is a narrow-body aircraft, and 737 engines have a distinctive, flattened lower surface, whereas the A320 series are more cylindrical.

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    $\begingroup$ Amazing! I already thought about looking if they only fly a specific Company, but I thought: Nahh. When looking at your second paragraph: Thats what I meant by "aviation wizard". Thank you! $\endgroup$ – Noah Krasser Feb 3 '17 at 11:30
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    $\begingroup$ While it is an EasyJet A319/A320, its not as easy as saying "its EasyJet so it can only be an A319/A320" because EasyJet flew 737s until 2011, so you have to rely on engine shape rather just airline... $\endgroup$ – Moo Feb 3 '17 at 15:45
  • $\begingroup$ Sub-question: doesn't the small triangular intake on top of the engine also give it away? I've never seen it on 737s. $\endgroup$ – peppe Feb 4 '17 at 1:08
  • $\begingroup$ @peppe that "small triangular intake" on top of the engine is a NACA duct. NACA DUCT ALL THE THINGS!!!! :) $\endgroup$ – FreeMan Mar 22 '17 at 20:19
  • $\begingroup$ Note that the newest 737s no longer have the familiar "hamster-pouch" intakes. $\endgroup$ – Sean Oct 18 '18 at 0:25
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According to Airfleets.net, EasyJet has a full Airbus fleet. This engine colouring indeed seems to belong to EasyJet so, yes that is an Airbus A320 family.

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    $\begingroup$ Sure, it looks like EasyJet but it isn't sure to be. And EasyJet used to fly 737s, too. So "It looks orange and the only airline I can think of that flies planes with orange engines is EasyJet, who currently only fly Airbus planes" isn't very conclusive. $\endgroup$ – David Richerby Feb 3 '17 at 17:09
  • $\begingroup$ Although not definitive, this news story is for exactly this photo. The Independent is not known for large inaccuracies or fabrications, unlike several other papers which also carried the same story so it's probably accurate in at least the basic fact of it's easyJet and they were taping the cowling. $\endgroup$ – Simon Feb 3 '17 at 18:23
  • $\begingroup$ @DavidRicherby: EasyJet had to explain publicly using speed duct is a common practice ("However an easyJet spokesperson told MailOnline Travel that in this instance, it was not used for repair work.") after the image made a hit on the net. $\endgroup$ – mins Feb 3 '17 at 20:03
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    $\begingroup$ Thanks, Simon and mins. That's much more convincing than the unstated reasoning of the answer. $\endgroup$ – David Richerby Feb 4 '17 at 10:28
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One could also look at the pylon which is very different on a 737 and doesn't have the NACA duct.

enter image description here

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