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In some modern aircraft such as the Airbus A380 or Boeing B787, the callout of the V1 speed is automated through a synthetic voice, based on the V-speeds entered into the flight management system. However, the rotate speed VR is still announced by the Pilot Monitoring. Why is the VR callout not automated?

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  • $\begingroup$ It would seem that calling out V1 is more of an alert and would help being announced automaltically while Vr is not. $\endgroup$ – user6035379 Jan 24 '17 at 15:30
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from my experience (A310, A320 family, A340), V1 and VR speeds are often very close together, sometimes they even are the same.

The automatic callout system can only output one signal at a time; during landings, one can often hear the decreasing radar altitude callouts being overlapped. Therefore, the VR callout would often supersede the - more safety relevant - V1 callout.

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    $\begingroup$ That doesn't explain why automated call outs are not used when V1 and Vr are 10 knots or even more apart. Wet or contaminated runways usually produce a large split in V1 and Vr speeds. $\endgroup$ – Mike Sowsun Jan 24 '17 at 14:20
  • $\begingroup$ @MikeSowsun I think it does. You want consistency, you don't want the PM going "now on this flight am I supposed to verbalise the call or will the computer do it?" $\endgroup$ – Ben Jan 24 '17 at 19:15
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    $\begingroup$ When V1 and Vr are close together, the automatic call out could easily be programmed to call out "V1, Rotate", in quick succession, just as the pilots do. There must be another reason why the manufacturers have chosen not to do it. $\endgroup$ – Mike Sowsun Jan 24 '17 at 20:45

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