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What is the maximum permissible slope for a table top Runway (elevation 1600 m) to be made on hill top ?

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    $\begingroup$ Courchevel Airport I believe is the steepest public-use runway with an 18.6% grade. Operating in that airport requires a special endorsement and training. $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Jan 16 '17 at 17:29
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    $\begingroup$ What country? What type of aircraft and operators? If there's no regulatory limit, there's probably a practical limit but it would depend on those details. $\endgroup$ – fooot Jan 16 '17 at 18:13
  • $\begingroup$ I think that's left up the pilot's discretion. $\endgroup$ – Carlo Felicione Jan 17 '17 at 4:41
  • $\begingroup$ I'm not completely sure what you're asking, but this question might be helpful $\endgroup$ – Pondlife Sep 15 '18 at 22:47
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Most Part-25 certified aircraft have an operating limit of roughly +/-2% for runway slope, as most of the runways fall into this category.

It would be probably possible to certify aircraft for steeper slopes, however at a significant cost, as the flight test program would have to be extended to collect sufficient data.

It is also worth mentioning that anything over 1% upslope requires a bit of a different flare technique as opposed to a flat runway. Usually a bit earlier flare with a bit late thrust reduction does the trick. Extending the limit beyond 2% would probably require additional training, as the flare characteristics would be significantly different than that at a normal runway.

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    $\begingroup$ Well, it is certainly possible to certify aircraft for steeper slopes, and some of them are, because there are places like VNLK (Hillary Tenzing Airport, Lukla, 12% slope) and LFLJ (Courchevel Altiport, over 18% slope). $\endgroup$ – Jan Hudec Sep 16 '18 at 20:56

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