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I'm studying ICAO Annex 6, but I am confused a little bit about the paragraph below:

6-2.2.3.4.2(b)

A flight to be conducted in accordance with the instrument flight rules shall not take off or continue beyond the point of in-flight re-planning unless at the aerodrome of intended landing or at each alternate aerodrome to be selected in compliance with 2.2.3.5, current meteorological reports or a combination of current reports and forecasts indicate that the meteorological conditions will be, at the estimated time of use, at or above the aerodrome operating minima for that operation.

Here I have simple question about following situations.

  1. Can I continue flight at the point of in-flight re-planning if: "destination airport WX > minima" & "alternate airport WX < minima"

  2. Can I continue flight at the point of in-flight re-planning if: "destination airport WX < minima" & "alternate airport WX > minima"

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    $\begingroup$ Annex 6 of....? the Convention on International Civil Aviation (link) $\endgroup$ – mins Dec 23 '16 at 9:52
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    $\begingroup$ Hi, and welcome to Aviation.SE. Whenever you ask about rules and regulations, it's important to state the jurisdiction since this is an international site. We have tags for the major jurisdictions such as EASA, CAA, FAA etc. $\endgroup$ – Simon Dec 23 '16 at 12:28
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it’s just a complicated way of saying: you are not allowed to begin an IFR flight either from the ground (“shall not take off”) nor can you file a new one in the air (“continue beyond the point of in-flight re-planning”) unless some weather conditions are met at the destination and nominated alternate(s).

I other words the “point of in-flight re-planning” is not a decision point, it’s just: the point where we would like to file (re-plan) a new flight plan (in-flight).

And the conditions are the same wether you are on the ground or already flying: either (destination WX > operational minima) or (ALL nominated and required alternates > planning minima)

note that (depending on jurisdiction) most of the times a minimum 2 alternates are required if destination WX < operational minima.

  1. Can I continue flight at the point of in-flight re-planning if: "destination APO WX > minima" & "alternate APO WX < minima"

if destination > minima, under specific circumstances you might not require an alternate. if still required, it must be nominated and above the planning minima. So answer : probably no.

  1. Can I continue flight at the point of in-flight re-planning if: "destination APO WX < minima" & "alternate APO WX > minima"

if destination < minima, you will most likely require 2 nominated alternates and the must BOTH be above planning minima. Shory answer: yes

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This means that we could take off even though the weather forecast indicates the weather at destination and/or alternates is below required minima, providing we nominate a decision point, with a suitable enroute alternate. If, on arriving at the destination point,the weather forecast at the destination remains below the minima, the pilot must divert to the nominated enroute alternate. So you can take off and continue until that point and if you see the weather at your destination is still below minima then you have to divert to your alternate, but if the weather at your destination will be above minima and the weather at your alternate won't be above minima, then you have to change your alternate or enroute alternate aerodrome because:

  1. All IFR flight have must have at least one alternate aerodrome
  2. Decision point procedure is also need an alternate (can be enroute)

This was Decision Point Procedure. If you don't have any alternate available, then you must apply with Pre-Determinded Point Procedure.

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  • $\begingroup$ I’m afraid the question has nothing to do with the Decision Point, which is a technique involving contingency fuel and has no bearing on the weather at destination. Pilots are free to continue flying to any airport regardless of weather conditions. Wether they can then begin/attempt an approach is a different issue. $\endgroup$ – Radu094 Dec 30 '17 at 17:30
  • $\begingroup$ also, there are cases when an IFR flight does not require any alternate. Can you name two of them? :-p $\endgroup$ – Radu094 Dec 30 '17 at 17:34

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