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Last month I was in Indonesia and I had to take a flight from Lombok International Airport (IATA: LOP). While I was waiting for boarding I noticed an airplane (wreck) next to the runway that was somewhat burned down at the front (fire?).

Abandoned plane at Lombok International Airport
The abandoned plane at Lombok International Airport. (personal photo)

I was intrigued by the way that it was just placed there, so close to the runway. I thought about an accident where this aircraft was involved in, could've have just happened a couple of days or weeks before. But I couldn't find any source in collaboration with this particular airport. I maybe thought that the airplane was used to train fire fighters, as I see that more often on other airports in the world. I tried to find more info about it on the web, but no luck.


The airplane on the map

I also headed out to Google Maps, Bing Maps and Apple Maps to see if the plane was there.

Google Maps has the airplane on its map (see image below, top middle and slightly to the left), the data is from 2016, so says the footer.

Google Maps location of airplane on Lombok International Airport
Google Maps location of airplane on Lombok International Airport, data consulted on 2 Dec 2016.


Bing Maps isn't having the airplane on its map, but maybe that's because the map is outdated (?).

Bing Maps location of Lombok International Airport
Bing Maps location of Lombok International Airport, data consulted on 2 Dec 2016.


Apple Maps shows an airplane in almost the same spot (it's just on the concrete I think), but is it the airplane?

Apple Maps location of 'airplane' on Lombok International Airport
Apple Maps location of 'airplane' on Lombok International Airport, data consulted on 2 Dec 2016.


Zoomed pictures of the plane

The above picture is zoomed in on in the following pictures. Unfortunately, the aircraft registration is not visible.

Zoomed in picture of abandoned plane at Lombok International Airport

Zoomed in picture of abandoned plane at Lombok International Airport

And now?

I'm eager to know what happened to this plane. What type is it? Who is the owner? Can anyone tell me? Thanks in advance.

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  • $\begingroup$ see answer update; it's been broken up and transferred $\endgroup$
    – ymb1
    Aug 17 at 16:55
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enter image description here
Source: planespotters.net

The aircraft's registration is PK-YVL. It's a Boeing 737-300 that was operated by Batavia Air before the airline ceased operations.

This plane is/was leased from Pacific AirFinance. It has been withdrawn from use and stored at LOP since 31 Jan 2013. After ceasing operation, some of the other 737-300's the airline had were delivered to Peruvian Airlines.

Due to its proximity to parked aircraft, it's not likely the plane has been converted to train firefighters. The darkened area could just be storm blown mud.

It was previously owned/operated by United:

enter image description here
Source: jetphotos.net; under previous operator United (1989–2009)

2021 update

It was broken up in 2018, and parts transferred for display/education to a Chinese College (Jiangxi Science & Technology Teachers' College):

enter image description here
Source: uulucky.com; translate.google.com link

enter image description here
Source: jxsfgz.com

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    $\begingroup$ Your answer is spot on. Thanks for the quick elaboration. $\endgroup$
    – Roy
    Dec 2 '16 at 21:02
  • $\begingroup$ I agree it could be mud but why is the landing gear up? $\endgroup$
    – dalearn
    Dec 2 '16 at 22:38
  • $\begingroup$ @dalearn You mean up? $\endgroup$
    – SnakeDoc
    Dec 2 '16 at 22:41
  • $\begingroup$ yes, I mean up... i was thinking of why it was laying down on the ground. :) $\endgroup$
    – dalearn
    Dec 2 '16 at 22:42
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    $\begingroup$ The nose gear is clearly down. The left nacelle still has ground clearance indicating left main is down. The right main is either sunk, shock strut collapsed, or partially gear up. $\endgroup$
    – Steve H
    Dec 3 '16 at 12:57
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It is entirely possible that it is there for firefighter training.

It may be an old, decommissioned plane that they can start small fires in, and plan how to approach a plane, practice aiming their water cannons and putting the fires out.

I believe that is the purpose of this plane, at Seattle's Boeing Field.

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    $\begingroup$ It used to be an exhibit at the Museum of Flight before being replaced, and was evidently removed recently. Seems like it was just being stored, doesn't seem to be a lot of evidence of traffic to it. $\endgroup$
    – fooot
    Dec 2 '16 at 20:59
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    $\begingroup$ It would be unusual to store other planes near the plane used for firefighter training. Also, there doesn't seem to be much damage to it. $\endgroup$ Dec 21 '16 at 21:43
  • $\begingroup$ They don't actually set a plane on "blazing-fireball inferno" for training. They can use a lot of smoke, and some relatively low-temperature combustibles to simulate a big fire and practice approaches and techniques. $\endgroup$
    – abelenky
    Dec 21 '16 at 21:45
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    $\begingroup$ @abelenky that entirely depends on the level of training. $\endgroup$
    – jwenting
    Jun 4 '19 at 10:46
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    $\begingroup$ I know this is an old question, but as I ran into it, might as well comment: evac training with smoke: possible, fire training even with "small" fires, not likely, playing with fire iside an aluminium tube is not recommended 😉 $\endgroup$
    – Jpe61
    Feb 11 '20 at 20:19
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Aircraft was not there anymore last September. Probably scrapped. Photo taken in 2017.the plane in question taken from the window of a passing plane

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    $\begingroup$ Thanks Alex for your update! I think this is more a comment to the question. $\endgroup$
    – Roy
    Feb 11 '20 at 20:45

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