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My question is about the Boeing 737 main landing gears:

When the landing gears are up you can see a landing gear door to open in most planes and then it closes. But for Boeing 737 main landing gear are not behind well doors at any time of the flight.

Why are main landing gear wells opened during in flight?

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marked as duplicate by mins, kevin, fooot, Federico, Ron Beyer Oct 26 '16 at 20:48

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    $\begingroup$ Related if not duplicate $\endgroup$ – TomMcW Oct 26 '16 at 19:58
  • $\begingroup$ similar but not answeres to my question $\endgroup$ – Dániel Kis Oct 26 '16 at 19:59
  • $\begingroup$ The question is more general than this, but the answere is good. $\endgroup$ – Dániel Kis Oct 26 '16 at 20:06
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    $\begingroup$ There's This one too $\endgroup$ – TomMcW Oct 26 '16 at 20:07
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To keep costs down. The extra friction from no gear doors is more than made up from the weight savings.

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  • $\begingroup$ Arguably: the proportions of the aircraft. The engines are tucked up close under the wing, permitting short landing gear. Retracting the wheels into the body of the aircraft (instead of the wing) allows the engines to be placed closer to the fuselage (better engine-out handling). But, the body is quite narrow, so the wheels in retracted position end up quite close together, leaving little to no room for doors. The wheel wells have "brushes" which help smooth the gap between the aircraft underside and exposed wheels, minimizing the drag penalty. $\endgroup$ – Anthony X Apr 27 at 22:25

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