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I'm listening to the On Wings of Eagles audiobook by Ken Follett and found some information about a non-stop transatlantic flight between Teheran (IKA) and Dallas (DFW). GCM says that this is 7,300 miles and Google says that's 11,750 km.

Was there any aircraft capable of performing such a flight in 1979? If yes, then which one?

It was expected to travel with about 10-15 people on board and non-stop flight seems to be essential (at least to the author, because I completely don't understand the reasons why such a flight couldn't take a re-fueling break at some European airport once clear of the dangerous zone of Iran's / Middle East's airspace).

The author's choice of either a Boeing 707 or 727 seems to be completely incorrect, as according to Wikipedia there wasn't any version of either of those aircraft capable of flying 7,300 miles non-stop (or I'm missing something). The longest range mentioned is 10,650 km in the case of the B707-320B.

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    $\begingroup$ The 747 could do it. $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Aug 17 '16 at 18:35
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    $\begingroup$ @mins Not directly explained in the book, but given conditions of plot action (chartered plane able to be ready as fast as possible) I assume that we're talking about completely unmodified plane with no additional tanks etc. $\endgroup$ – trejder Aug 17 '16 at 18:40
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    $\begingroup$ "1978 - Omni leases a Boeing 707 to Ross Perot for rescue of EDS employees from Tehran. The story would later be chronicled in Ken Follett's bestselling book 'On Wings of Eagles'" (source). $\endgroup$ – mins Aug 17 '16 at 18:46
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    $\begingroup$ Usually, the "Maximum Range" quoted on Wikipedia is at the Maximum Take-Off Weight, something that probably wouldn't happen with 10-15 people on board. To get the true range you would need to have the aircraft performance charts. $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Aug 17 '16 at 18:46
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    $\begingroup$ BTW, you don't need to go via GCM and Google to get distances in kilometers: you can select your units in GCM. (Here's IKA-DFW in km.) $\endgroup$ – David Richerby Aug 17 '16 at 21:14
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Even for zero payload, no B707 model is able to fly more than 6000nmi (11111km). B727 even has less range.

However, Iranair planned to run Tehran-LAX flight, which length is 12222km, but never materialized because of 1979 revolution. The flight could have been operated by the 747SP (introduced in 1976), similar to their Tehran-JFK route.

B707

B727

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    $\begingroup$ As in my comment to Dave's answer, it seems, that you confirm my assumption -- it is possible in general, but author's selection of 707 is a completely wrong path. Am I correct? $\endgroup$ – trejder Aug 18 '16 at 6:04
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    $\begingroup$ @trejder Maximum range may vary for other reasons like jet stream which does not take into consideration on the table above. $\endgroup$ – Him Aug 18 '16 at 16:26
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    $\begingroup$ Your image links are broken. $\endgroup$ – Sean May 4 at 21:00
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Sure it was possible as for the list of planes that depends on if you consider the planes in their base configuration or not. Just about any plane out there could be fitted with Ferry Tanks allowing for ranges that are well outside its quoted maximum range. As you mention the aircraft only needs to hold 10-15 people, in the spirit of completeness for what its worth a plane like a 747 can fly a lot farther if there is only 15 people on board and the rest of the plane is effectively a flying fuel tank. While this may not be the immediate case there the idea is similar.

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    $\begingroup$ Please, consider my comment added an hour before your answer. It seems -- due to story plot (an extreme rush) -- though not clearly stated in a book, that we're talking about unmodified plane only (no external tanks). Plus: it seems, that even though 747 can do this, author's selection of unmodified 707 (727 also considered, but rejected) is a wrong shot. Can you confirm that? Thank you. $\endgroup$ – trejder Aug 18 '16 at 6:02
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Sure. A B-36 produced from 1946 and onwards has a range of approx. 10.000 miles according to Wikiepdia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convair_B-36_Peacemaker#Specifications_.28B-36J-III.29

According to the book "B-36 - Cold War Shield" a regular long-range crew numbered around 15 people, plus possible obeservers.

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    $\begingroup$ Don't think any were still flying by 1979, though! $\endgroup$ – Andrew Aug 18 '16 at 20:42

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