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I suspect the single-pilot business jet with the longest range is the SyberJet SJ30x:

  • NBAA IFR Range with 100 nm Alternate
  • M 0.76 (1 pilot + 2 passengers; passenger/pilot at 90 kg each)
  • 2,575 nmi (4,769 km).

But I am not sure; also, there are many negative reviews regarding SyberJet company and its aircraft of which, by the way, only a dozen have been produced for now. Are there any single-pilot certified jet with longer range in comparison with SyberJet SJ30x?

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    $\begingroup$ Hello Max, welcome to Aviation.SE. $\endgroup$ – DeltaLima Jul 7 '16 at 14:02
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks a lot, @DeltaLima ! Really happy to be here. But unfortunately I have very low English-ability. $\endgroup$ – Max Jul 7 '16 at 15:09
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    $\begingroup$ don't worry about your English level. There are many people here that aren't native English speakers, including me. Overall I find this community is quite patient and helpful when it comes to understanding and improving questions. Just be as patient with those trying to help you and you'll be fine. $\endgroup$ – DeltaLima Jul 7 '16 at 15:14
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    $\begingroup$ I used to ask this same question. That is, what is the longest range single-pilot aircraft? One contributor noted the potential for using ferry tanks to extend range. But, that contributor said it is not practical for regular use. If "practicality" is included as a qualifier, it would seem that the aircraft's own range is not the limitation. Instead, it would be the pilot's and/or passengers' personal range that would seem to be the limitation. That is -- in all seriousness -- how long between relief breaks? Even if an aircraft has a lavatory for passengers . . . although, not all do. $\endgroup$ – Todd C. Ganos Aug 4 '17 at 2:24
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There are only a hand full of single pilot jets in production currently and the SJ30x seems to have the longest range by far. The other competitors in the space, the Cessna Citation Mustang, The Honda Jet and the D-Jet come in roughly in the 1300-1500 mile mark which is far less than the SJ30x.

Depending on how far you are willing to stretch the planes you include many military fighters, many of which you can own (which are generally single pilot planes) have a range that competes with or exceeds the SJ30x.

There is another caveat to this as well. All of these planes can in theory be fitted with ferry tanks which can greatly extend their range for a single mission. Its generally impractical to do this on a constant basis but it can be done in one off scenarios.

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    $\begingroup$ He didn't specify current production, so that means that there are other aircraft to consider as well... $\endgroup$ – Lnafziger Jul 7 '16 at 21:04
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There aren't any civilian, current-production jets that come close to the range of the SJ30 for single pilot operations based on my research, although one or two turboprops have comparable ranges. I consulted Aviation Week's "Business Airplane's 2012" and the only other light jets listed with a long range are the Embraer Phenom 300 with a range of 1,954 nm, and the Cessna Citation CJ4 with a range of 1,913 nm. The Cessna CJ3 comes in at a respectable 1,869 nm. The PC-24, which is still undergoing certification in 2016, is listed here with an NBAA range of 1,950 nm. All of these are (or will be) single-pilot certified in at least one cockpit configuration, to my knowledge.

Is there any reason you're restricting this to jets and not turboprops? (Speed is one of the biggest differences between the two categories.) The King Air 350IER has a range of 2,239 nm. Several other turboprops have ranges that are comparable to average light business jets, like the PC-12 NG which has a range of 1,544 nm.

Here's a graph of my own making to show these statistics:

enter image description here

For any readers unfamiliar with the restrictions regarding FAA approval for single-pilot operations, here's a good source: http://www.flyingmag.com/single-pilot-jets . The biggest stipulation is that transport category aircraft (12,500+ lb MTOW or not commuter category) are assumed to be two-pilot aircraft.

Note: all ranges listed here except the PC-24's range are NBAA IFR max fuel ranges w/ 100 nm alternate as listed in Aviation Week's "Business Airplanes 2012"

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The CJ4 is, with nearly 2000 nm. Some would say the SyberJet SJ30 but since you can't buy one yet the Cessna CJ4 is the winner in jets. And in turboprops the Beechcraft 350ER.

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The SyberJet doesn't exist for practical purposes. The design has changed hands through at least 4 different manufacturers and only about 15 were ever built IIRC. Try looking for one on www.controller.com for one and you'll see that the brand isn't even listed because they've never sold one used.

If you want a long range single pilot jet, the best game in town is the Citation S/II with the Williams Engine FJ-44 engine mods by Sierra (called the Super S/II) or similar modder. They can hold ~5800lbs of fuel and with the new engines, they climb faster, cruise faster, and burn less fuel. They can go 2300-2600nm, depending on the upgrades. This is basically the same airframe as the Citation 1 & Mustang (500/501 airframe) and Citation II & Bravo (550 airframe, longer than 500), but with more fuel capacity and a very efficient supercritical wing.

The Citation Super S/II (Sierra's modded plane) has a maximum takeoff weight of 15000lbs, so it has stricter standards to meet than a "Part 23" aircraft which must be under 12500lbs. There is no jet that you can actually buy that weighs under 125000bs and can go 2600nm that I'm aware of, and believe me I have looked. That makes the Super S/II the closest thing I've found to an affordable single-pilot jet for long missions.

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Cessna Citation 501sp Eagle II, spx. has a 1,987 NM range.

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