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Is an endorsement required to fly act as pilot-in-command of an airplane equipped with a constant-speed propeller, adjustable flaps, and fixed-gear?

This does not meet the complex airplane definition because it is not equipped with retractable landing gear.

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No, you do not need a complex airplane endorsement for this airplane because it doesn't have retractable gear, unless it is a seaplane.

All three elements are required for that endorsement to be necessary for landplanes.

A jet-engine is not a controllable-pitch propeller, therefore it would not require a complex endorsement even if it has retractable gear and flaps.

However, the above would require a type-rating because it is a jet.

An airplane with a controllable-pitch propeller and retractable landing gear that isn't equipped with flaps would also not fit the definition of complex, so you are absolutely right.

See §61.31(e) Additional training required for operating complex airplanes

The definition for complex is in the Airplane Flying Handbook Ch 11,

“A complex airplane is defined as an airplane equipped with a retractable landing gear, wing flaps, and a controllable-pitch propeller. For a seaplane to be considered complex, it is required to have wing flaps and a controllable-pitch propeller.

The definition for complex as shown in 14 CFR §61.1(b)(iii):

"Complex airplane means an airplane that has a retractable landing gear, flaps, and a controllable pitch propeller, including airplanes equipped with an engine control system consisting of a digital computer and associated accessories for controlling the engine and propeller, such as a full authority digital engine control; or, in the case of a seaplane, flaps and a controllable pitch propeller, including seaplanes equipped with an engine control system consisting of a digital computer and associated accessories for controlling the engine and propeller, such as a full authority digital engine control."

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    $\begingroup$ @Fishdoc - glad this helped you! Give it about 24 hours to see if other answers come along (you may find one that better answers your question, or that answers an additional question you didn't even know you had), then be sure to stop by by and give it a check mark as the accepted answer. That's the best way to say "thank you". $\endgroup$ – FreeMan Jun 15 '16 at 12:41
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    $\begingroup$ Also the distinction between controllable-pitch propeller and constant-speed propeller is significant. There are now aircraft that have constant-speed propellers, but have RPM automatically selected depending on power and air speed and don't have separate propeller control lever. $\endgroup$ – Jan Hudec Jun 15 '16 at 13:15
  • $\begingroup$ Ok, so it turns out there actually isn't distinction between controllable-pitch and constant-speed propeller. If the pitch is not fixed, it counts as complex aircraft even though with automatic control it might be easier to fly than with fixed pitch. It does add some failure modes though. $\endgroup$ – Jan Hudec Jun 16 '16 at 8:19
  • $\begingroup$ My understanding, BTW, is that jets in the sub-12.5klb weight class do not require a type rating to fly $\endgroup$ – UnrecognizedFallingObject Jun 16 '16 at 22:20
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    $\begingroup$ @RyanMortensen -- I stand corrected, actually -- it's a separate clause in 61.31 $\endgroup$ – UnrecognizedFallingObject Jun 17 '16 at 0:05

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