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  1. Is there any reason why frontal stabilizers aren't used on blimps or airships to ease maneuverability in, e.g., gusty winds? Even the indoor blimps have a tail rotor, not the nose rotor for rapid yaw movements.

  2. Also, is there any reason why the "pusher" motors are used instead of puller-ones in the front (with an exception for the Lockheed Martin P-791)?

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    $\begingroup$ Possible duplicate of Why are vertical stabilizers always at the rear of an airplane? $\endgroup$ – fooot Jun 13 '16 at 14:38
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    $\begingroup$ Well, I dare to say this isn't a duplicate post. I've carefully chosen the title to contain the word "use" rather than "rely-upon" or "replace". How about classical reasonably sized tail-stabilizers working together with tiny nose-stabilizers for improved agility? $\endgroup$ – FlegmatoidZoid Jun 13 '16 at 14:59
  • $\begingroup$ @fooot The other question you linked to is about "aircraft" and the answers only cover fixed-wing aircraft. This one is specifically about airships. $\endgroup$ – Pondlife Jun 13 '16 at 15:03
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    $\begingroup$ The principles of stability are the same. $\endgroup$ – fooot Jun 13 '16 at 15:09
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    $\begingroup$ Hmm, so why are there no aircrafts with i.e. 3 symmetric tail surfaces spaced at 120deg? $\endgroup$ – FlegmatoidZoid Jun 13 '16 at 16:25
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It depends if you want stability or manuverability. see this video.

It also has to do with if you want to attempt to keep laminar flow over the nose of the airship...

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Aviation.SE! This is a nice video, but could you please explain the key points from the video in your answer. In case the link breaks or the video is deleted, the answer would become useless otherwise. $\endgroup$ – Bianfable Mar 7 at 18:39
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Frontal surfaces are not stabilizers, they are destabilizers.

Form the pilot's point of view in the forward control cabin, manoeuvering accurately around the mooring point is far easier if corrections make the tail move a little to one side or the other, rather than making the nose, complete with their vantage point and the mooring rope, swing sideways.

Engines at the front just mess up the airflow over the body of the airship, while much of their thrust is dissipated in the mess. At the back they can help re-energise the boundary layer. Propellers also add side area and have a secondary action to stabilize or destabilize in the same way as fixed surfaces.

However most airships are multi-engined, with them installed in pods along the sides. Historically these installations have varied with pushers, tractors or both installed on the one pod. More recently, swivelling ducted fans have become commonplace.

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